5409 posts The Dude Abides
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CodingJack says

I know there have been some other threads discussing this. But as Envato continues to grow, the bigger an issue this seems to be.

The problem:

Buyers are purchasing non-WordPress scripts and templates from CodeCanyon and ThemeForest assuming they are WordPress compatible.

The challenge:

Starting an item’s description with something negative isn’t the greatest introduction. On the other hand, adding “not WordPress compatible” in special notes at the bottom of the description (usually where these type of things are placed) are not often read.

On a side note, I usually suggest that the buyer contact support to “see if they can get a refund”. But honestly I don’t even know if refunds are given in these situations.

A possible solution:

A “WordPress Compatible” tag below “Compatible Browsers” on the right site of the item’s homepage. Seems to be a logical place for this information, and will be much easier for buyers to discover than scrolling to the bottom of an item’s description.

Any thoughts or other ideas? And does everyone else experience this on a regular basis like I do?

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AGSoft says

If buyers are stupid enough not to read the description it’s their own fault imo.

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CodingJack says

If buyers are stupid enough not to read the description it’s their own fault imo.

But what if an author doesn’t add this information to their item’s description? Regardless, support is probably burdened with complaint emails, and the author is now at the mercy of a buyer who wasn’t able to use their product (which could lead to unjustified poor ratings).

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AGSoft says

But what if an author doesn’t add this information to their item’s description? Regardless, support is probably burdened with complaint emails, and the author is now at the mercy of a buyer who wasn’t able to use their product (which could lead to unjustified poor ratings).
Regardless of whether it’s in the description or not doesn’t matter. It says nothing about it in the sidebar, thus it’s their fault if they buy it expecting it to work with WordPress.

Regarding them rating it, that’s why in it’s current state the rating system is pointless. There needs to be some sort of justification(as in, they have to give a valid reason as to why they’re rating an item with a poor rating) for the rating. Until something like this is implemented the rating system is quite frankly useless, but sadly you have a point. Your best bet would be to offer a WordPress version, and link to high up in the description.

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sevenspark Moderator says

The problem is that there is a percentage of customers that just make bad assumptions, or don’t have a clear enough idea of how a website works to be able to grasp the full picture – either they are too lazy to read the description, or they don’t have the necessary experience/expertise to recognize what the product is that they’re looking at. Like they can’t tell the difference between a motorcycle and a bicycle because they don’t understand what an engine is.

For those that are unable to make this important distinction, I doubt the lack of “WordPress Compatible” on the page is going to make a difference – its absence won’t trigger the realization that this is not what they’re looking for.

Unfortunately, we can’t list everything a product isn’t compatible with – Not compatible with WordPress, Not compatible with Drupal, Not compatible with Joomla… obviously that would be silly – and, as you mentioned, unnecessarily negative.

The best solution is better customer education – but it’s difficult to get a customer who won’t even read an item description to read a lesson on the differences between a WordPress theme and a Site Template, a WordPress plugin and a jQuery plugin. That being said, I do think we could do better here with a bit of a primer – a ThemeForest/CodeCanyon 101 if you will. I think as the market expands and more and more people build web sites, the median entry level of expertise is decreasing.

[Maybe we could get a solid, straight to the point welcome video? People like videos; they hate reading]

This might be a terrible idea, but it would force users to identify their product type and avoid confusion: when they come to the site, they are presented with a modal dialogue where they must select which type of product they need – WordPress Theme | Site Template | Drupal Theme – including “I don’t know” (where they can get more information) or “I’ll decide later”.

Once this selection is known, we still allow them to search the whole site, but then on an individual page, we can dynamically post a visual alert (say a big checkmark or an X) that indicates whether the current product matches their desired category.

In other words, while we can’t list everything an item doesn’t do, we could simply state whether or not the product meets the customer’s stated requirements.

Okay, probably overly complex, but just throwing it out there. In the end, I do think it’s the customer’s responsibility to understand what they are buying – I think we should do whatever we can to minimize those situations (it’s bad for everyone involved), but if a customer is unwilling to take the time to educate themselves, there’s little we can do I think.

Oh dear, that was far too long ;)

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VF says

I think the reason for such high number of mistaken purchases are due to false advertisements made by 3rd parties who targets referrals. I am not sure that is the only reason but looking at how many unknown friends referring our files, this also could be the reason. Such cases, buyers may not go completely through item description and assume the category name they looked at 3rd party sites.

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sevenspark Moderator says

I think the reason for such high number of mistaken purchases are due to false advertisements made by 3rd parties who targets referrals. I am not sure that is the only reason but looking at how many unknown friends referring our files, this also could be the reason. Such cases, buyer’s may not go completely through item description and assume the category name they looked at 3rd party sites.

That’s a very good point. A lot of those sites are irresponsible. It’d be interesting to match referrals to mistaken purchases and see what the correlation is.

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wickedpixel says

I even have a text that points the Wordpress version for a template but I just got a complain that they bought the wrong file. :|

Another misleading thing may be that users see the “More Files By” section and click there without noticing they left the Wordpress template type section. There are placed all types of files from tf.

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VF says

This may help :P

\\

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dtbaker Moderator says

most buyers who complain to me just think wordpress is everything – if there isn’t a “this will not work with wordpress” on the item page then it will not click with them.

a possible solution is for authors to double-dip and convert all non-wp items to wp, and then insert a nice big button at the top of the non-wp item page saying “Want to use WordPress? Click here to buy the WordPress compatible item!” :) wish it was that easy.

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