905 posts
  • Australia
  • Sold between 5 000 and 10 000 dollars
  • Most Wanted Bounty Winner
  • Exclusive Author
  • Has been a member for 1-2 years
  • Bought between 1 and 9 items
JBlanks says

Hi Udo – thanks for the epic post mate! Great to hear your story and see the early gear that you cut your teeth on. Like the multitrack process you developed too – it’s funny to think back on all the ways we had to improvise in the past to create multitrack music with the limited gear we had access to.

The Hammond organ instructions were fun to – nice to know we don’t have to give our modern keyboards an oil change anymore!

The time in the Caribbean sounds like a lot of fun – pity that didn’t become a full time job! I can think of far worse fates…

It’s funny that the old Commodore 64 was used by a few guys so far to make music – we had one and I just remember having to load lots of tapes to play video games – didn’t really use it for much else at the time. My brother still has one actually.

It’s evident from your music that there is a lifetime of experience behind what you do and I think you’re going to be top composer on this time in the future. Your new track “Over the Highlands” is terrific and one of my faves on the site. Great to hear your story, I feel like I know you a lot better now Good one and thanks for sharing your story with the rest of us my friend. :)

920 posts Go Acoustic!
  • Elite Author
  • Sold between 100 000 and 250 000 dollars
  • Author had a File in an Envato Bundle
  • Has been a member for 4-5 years
  • Referred between 1 and 9 users
  • Bought between 1 and 9 items
  • United States
jhunger says


I tried to play in bands in college (Eugene, OR), and later in Seattle, mainly with my SeaportSound co-collaborator, Natt, but it never really went anywhere except that we composed literally 100s of songs. After that, I mostly just muddled around in my spare time. And then in 2009 I discovered stock music, and started writing and recording again. That’s about it! Now I’m just climbing the learning curve, and having a blast. Thanks for this thread, Jamie – I haven’t read everybody’s bio yet but I plan to go through them in the next day or two.

Hi Joel! First time we’ve connected and very happy to do so. I’ve been listening to your stuff and it’s very clear why you’re doing so well here. Thanks for making AJ a popular destination – all the successful authors have built this place and we are the beneficiaries of your hard work. Without your talents our clients would not come back here so you have my respect and gratitude.

Cool story and reinforces again how personal music is for all of us. I was in a band (errrgh not a good time) and quickly realised I was a better solo act than a band member. I’m curious as to what point we need to arrive at for us to be able to sustain ourselves through writing music. Certainly helps if you land a few big gigs along the way, but there are guys on AJ making big money each month and could probably survive on that.

Many of us do other things to make money, but derive our real joy in life from music only. Some of us figure it out earlier than others too by the sounds of things. One of the common themes though so far as that even those of us who gave it up for a while, eventually decided to return to their passion.

Seems more than just a few of us were conflicted about the choice to do that though. Certainly the ability to earn money out of a music career is the #1 reason we take other paths sometimes.

Anyways – I love to see any composer doing well – and you’re doing great Joel. Thanks for replying and look forward to chatting with you more in the future. :)

Hey Jamie, it’s good to connect with you as well! I haven’t been as active as I’d like on the forums lately but I’ve read a good many of your posts (and listened to your work), and it’s a boon to AudioJungle to have you on board.

909 posts
  • Exclusive Author
  • Has been a member for 1-2 years
  • Sold between 100 and 1 000 dollars
  • United States
Kurlykovs says

When did i become a composer? I have no idea :D when i was a kid, we had instruments laying around. Mother used to play a piano, Grandmother played Mandolin and my Grandpa played brass instruments in a military orchestra. So i used to mess around with them and then i just started playing guitar and that is what i do for a very very long time now and i gotta say i love it! Now why did i become a composer the answer is easy, i was just too lazy to learn new song/melodies, so i started coming up with my own :D. I hope it makes sense!

Cheers guys!

1330 posts
  • Author had a File in an Envato Bundle
  • Sold between 10 000 and 50 000 dollars
  • Exclusive Author
  • Has been a member for 2-3 years
  • Referred between 1 and 9 users
  • Europe
  • Envato Studio (Microlancer) Beta Tester
  • Bought between 10 and 49 items
LumenMedia says

Well, excellent stories from you, gyus. Really remind me my way. My passion to music began when I first heared records of Kraftwerk and Jean Michel Jarre. So I began to dream about my own synthesizer. I studied accordeon this years and had fun with playing some of Jarre track on it. My first synthesizer was Alisa – something similar to mini Moog. I tried to record music with my friend, using two tape recorders. It was awesome! Inspite of too noisy sound, our first records selected for electronic music radio show on first fm stereo station in Novosibirsk. It was fantastic! A lot of phone calls, even first our fans! Today I produce mostly trance music. A lot of releases, remixes and supports from djs. It so pleasant now to record music! A lot easier than before. But every time I hear Jarre records, I remember this fantastic feeling of space, youth and future.

905 posts
  • Australia
  • Sold between 5 000 and 10 000 dollars
  • Most Wanted Bounty Winner
  • Exclusive Author
  • Has been a member for 1-2 years
  • Bought between 1 and 9 items
JBlanks says

First time I heard Jarre was in the movie “Gallipoli” by Peter Weir when it came out in the 80s – he didn’t get a huge amount of airplay in Australia back in the late 70s and 80s. Then I discovered a friend of mine had access to his father’s awesome record collection and Oxygene was in there, I’d never heard a Jarre record until that time. I wore out the tape recording I made after a few years and bought every edition when it hit CD. Can remember it just made me crazy to get my own synth. I loved the sound so much Jarre was producing. I get those memories too LumenMedia when I hear that music. Brings back only good memories.

Cool story. Udo, who posted earlier, is a big Jarre guy too so nice to know there’s quite a few of us hanging out in the jungle. ;) If you haven’t checked out his track “Heart of Jarre” it comes highly recommended.

383 posts
  • Bought between 1 and 9 items
  • Exclusive Author
  • Has been a member for 1-2 years
  • Sold between 1 000 and 5 000 dollars
  • United Kingdom
Revturkey says

I just bought a nice copy of Oxygene on vinyl last week. Sounds great, takes me back :)

1278 posts
  • Exclusive Author
  • Sold between 1 000 and 5 000 dollars
  • Germany
  • Referred between 1 and 9 users
  • Bought between 1 and 9 items
  • Football Contest Participant/Runner-up
  • Has been a member for 1-2 years
UJ-pro says

omg – what a wonderful thread. Thank you Jamie.

It’s so lovely to read about your relationship to J. M. Jarre. One time I heard a tape of his father Maurice Jarre. It was fantastic music. Untill than I didn’t know that he’s a famous filmmusic composer. Unfortunately I didn’t here more of him yet. But I sure will later. Jamie will know him for sure.

Of course Jarre wasn’t the only impressing musician in this time. I heard a lot of other music as well. I’m a groove-man. So the 80s have been my time with amazing groovy music with a lot of bass slaping from Level 42, Mezzoforte, Shakatak, Casiopea (great japanese band), Earth, Wind & Fire (still listening to all the old personal evergreens), Al Jarreau, Mike Oldfield (the older records), Frank Zappa and many other breathtaking jazz and funk musicians.

Later I learned more jazz music of different other genius. In that time I always had a relationship to brilliant drum player even if this never went to a main instrument of me because of the neighborhood. :-) Dave Weckl, Winnie Colaiuta, Steve Gadd, Alex Acuña, Simon Philips and so much more. I love to hear them playing. Barbarous!

There was only one time where I shared an apartment with another musician friend without neighbors. In that time I got my one big drumkit but didn’t practice really much. More for funny sessions. :D

Again I start writing about my experiences. I just wanted to thank you for your open words and big nice stories. I couldn`t read much for now but I will continue step by step.

Jamie! :D It’s nice to read that you choose the play-by-ear and dodgy findering method as well. :D That’s not really helping us but always good to know that there are other stunning composers with similar deficits. :-)

I’m surprised you are a great violin player. Why didn’t you continue? Maybe you answered this already. How I said, didn’t read all. EastWest may not help you coming back to the violin. :D I hold a violin in my hands just one time and was afraid to break it. So fragile! I’m sure you could include the violin quite nice in some songs. You should try it one time for us!!! We’ll hear if it’s EW Gypsy. :-)

Do you really write scores. I mean writing the music in notes? I’m not sure if I understand it correctly because I think you call the composing/recording “writing” as well, don’t you!?

It’ not difficult to hear how used you are to movie music. How perfectly and professional you handle and mix these great sounds and effects. You’re producing stunning music in all ways.

You’re parents are right. You are a prodigy!

My friends, I will get back to the other posts later. Too much for one time.

Cheers, Udo

905 posts
  • Australia
  • Sold between 5 000 and 10 000 dollars
  • Most Wanted Bounty Winner
  • Exclusive Author
  • Has been a member for 1-2 years
  • Bought between 1 and 9 items
JBlanks says

Hi Udo – I stopped with violin after I left school as it wasn’t something I enjoyed playing solo. I was in school orchestra (we were really good too) and loved that, but once the brass, woodwinds, percussion and piano were taken away – it was just me on my violin. And solo violin is great for evoking loneliness! Got too busy with film school and making movies at that point anyway.

I write all my music at the piano/Korg Oasys. No need to write it down because Logic does that for me, and I can edit easily inside the software. Have exported sheet music for orchestra in the past using that method and as long as I don’t stray from the range of any given instrument, it does a pretty good job – with a pass by a proper orchestrator.

Thanks for all the kind words my friend. You are too generous to me… Thank you also for sending me your jazz piece – as I said it would be something Mr Metheny himself would have enjoyed. You should totally post it on AJ. It’s excellent music and deserves to be heard. Cheers JB.

176 posts
  • Interviewed on the Envato Notes blog
  • France
  • Bought between 1 and 9 items
  • Referred between 1 and 9 users
  • Sold between 5 000 and 10 000 dollars
  • Has been a member for 2-3 years
  • Exclusive Author
StudioLeBus says

Hey JB you should have done gypsy jazz if you wanted to enjoy more violin :):) Look at the master :)

1278 posts
  • Exclusive Author
  • Sold between 1 000 and 5 000 dollars
  • Germany
  • Referred between 1 and 9 users
  • Bought between 1 and 9 items
  • Football Contest Participant/Runner-up
  • Has been a member for 1-2 years
UJ-pro says

..... as I said it would be something Mr Metheny himself would have enjoyed. You should totally post it on AJ. It’s excellent music and deserves to be heard. Cheers JB.

:bashful: Thanks my friend :bashful:

It’s already uploaded and I’m very curious if somebody even listen to it. I listen to some songs of our Jazz library yesterday and notice that there really great compositions on here. Of course with less sales because the market for this music isn’t that big. It’s more for the personal enjoying.

It’s a great thing when you can handle the notes inside the DAW for other musicians. I never tried because I never needed. And I’m far away from notes. I can read and identify them like single letters and know how many ”#” or “b” a harmony has got. But that’s not enough to set the notes right.

Thanks StudioLeBus for this great video. What a feeling. Fantastic player!

Cheers, Udo

by
by
by
by
by
by