12 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 1 year
  • Has sold $100+ on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Located in Portugal
Andrew_Parish says

Hey folks!

I listen to many songs with acoustic and electric guitars (clean and distorted), ukuleles, and so forth. How is that recorded? Are they loops ready for use, or are they created from scratch? Audio or midi?

Any vst’s you would recomend for cubase?

Thanks!

Love to all!

1335 posts
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Made it to the Authors' Hall of Fame
  • Has sold $1,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 1 year
+4 more
UJ-pro says

Olá!

Not all of the acoustic Instruments you can here at AJ are plugins. Sometimes they are real.

I used an acoustic concert guitar from the Steinberg Halion Sonic in this Item. I played the melody live with a Ukulele. Works good together. You can hear the version without Drums and Bass from 1:44:

http://audiojungle.net/item/in-the-morning/4054559

There will be a song released in about 3 days where I used a strumming background E-Guitar from EastWest Goliath.

I´m also interested in experiences of other authors.

249 posts
  • Has referred 1+ members
  • Has sold $5,000+ on Envato Market
  • Had an item featured in an Envato Bundle
  • Interviewed on an Envato blog
+4 more
DanHoodMusic says

Real guitars are the way to go for me!! I guess that’s obvious since guitar is my main instrument. You just can’t get the subtleties of a real acoustic guitar with a VST… You can get kinda there, but you can’t beat a real acoustic recorded well…

1 post
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 1 year
  • Has referred 10+ members
magentosites says

Olá!

Not all of the acoustic Instruments you can here at AJ are plugins. Sometimes they are real.

I used an acoustic concert guitar from the Steinberg Halion Sonic in this Item. I played the melody live with a Ukulele. Works good together. You can hear the version without Drums and Bass from 1:44:

http://audiojungle.net/item/in-the-morning/4054559

There will be a song released in about 3 days where I used a strumming background E-Guitar from EastWest Goliath.

I´m also interested in experiences of other authors.

Very good composition, but the guitar just sounds too fake to me. I think it’s extremely hard to emulate an acoustic guitar in a good way with VSTs. Electric guitar power chords is one thing, but the dynamics involved in real acoustic guitar playing is best done in real life.

205 posts
  • Has referred 10+ members
  • Has sold $100+ on Envato Market
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
  • Made it to the Authors' Hall of Fame
+3 more
TJMusic says

In past I cooperated with guitarists for recording acoustic and electric guitars, but for AudioJungle production, I found it inconvenient to have to sign copyright papers with session musicians, so I learned to make guitars on the synth, even if it seemed totally inappropriate ;)

I don’t use any specialized software for this purpose, I just take a guitar sound from a hardware synth, and program a sequencer to play it the notes it should. So in order to program the strumming, I need to know exactly what strumming pattern I want, where will I strum up or down, and how I would play given chords on a guitar. I put fingers on a keyboard on E, A, D, G, H, E first, to remind where the strings are, then I think how given chord can be played :)

It took months of practice to learn to program strumming, starting with a bit simple and stiff attempt like in these tracks:

http://audiojungle.net/item/happy-customer/1198981
http://audiojungle.net/item/a-joyful-day/1463117

Finally, I got some hold on it in this track, however the strum pattern was still relatively simple:

http://audiojungle.net/item/successful-business-background/1545545

Then, I spent a very long time remaking one of my older tracks, adding a guitar it really needed there, and I made very complicated strum patterns there. I used this experience in making similarly complex strum patterns in my latest track as well.

http://audiojungle.net/item/fastlane-journey/760192
http://audiojungle.net/item/business-solution/4167526

These two tracks can be an example that programming a guitar can be not that bad, if a lot of work is spent on it. First of these tracks use a guitar sound from Alesis QSR, the other uses E-mu Morpheus. In the latter case, I even used Morpheus advanced filters to program strumming down to sound brighter than strumming up, and also I’ve varied the brightness of the sound on different chords depending on intended artistic expression.

Probably a skilled guitar player would just play it all from scratch with a better result, but I’d probably never keep such minute control on the way it’s played if other person was holding the griff :)

550 posts
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Has sold $10,000+ on Envato Market
  • Had an item featured on Envato Market
  • Has referred 1+ members
+2 more
NoizMan says

Hi,

Since Guitar is my main instrument, I don’t use loops or samples for guitar parts. For electric guitars, I use waves GTR, Guitar Rig and Logic’s Amp Designer as amp simulators. I have a Schecter c1 plus, a semi hollow body Epiphone and a 7 stringed Ibanez for different styles and sounds.

For example in this piece, I used the 7 stringed Ibanez to create the brutal sound. http://audiojungle.net/item/cinematic-action/4234786
In this track below, I used the semi hollow body Epiphone.
http://audiojungle.net/item/echoes-from-the-future/4053196

For acoustic guitar recording, I use two microphones… One pointing at the fretboard ( like 12th fret ), and one pointing somewhere around the bridge. Tha best way to find the right point is listening. Close one ear and listen with the other. Find the right place and place your microphone. Listen from your monitors to check the combination of two microphones and make a test record to check the phase.

Good luck. Happy guitar sessions :)

60 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 2 years
  • Has sold $100+ on Envato Market
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
TheRedGiant says

I too use real guitars. I’ve been working on my “brutal” guitar/drums tone for many many years (mostly with 7-string guitars, like NoizMan).

Right now I use a TC Electronic VPD1 mixed with some mild amp simulation and a tiny bit of EQ on the DAW’s tracks. But I try to be as minimalistic as possible, the lesser the plugins the better, in order to save CPU resources, and so that it’s not much of a pain to move my sound to another DAW in the future.

I really dislike sequenced guitars. People say powerchords are supposed to be “easier” to simulate, but to my ears most sequenced powerchords I’ve heard are as painfully obvious as any other kind of sequenced guitars.

Having said that, I think TJMusic is very close to reaching nice sounding acoustic strumming. At least it has some “life” to it, which is a must when simulating guitars I think.

550 posts
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Has sold $10,000+ on Envato Market
  • Had an item featured on Envato Market
  • Has referred 1+ members
+2 more
NoizMan says

I too use real guitars. I’ve been working on my “brutal” guitar/drums tone for many many years (mostly with 7-string guitars, like NoizMan).

Right now I use a TC Electronic VPD1 mixed with some mild amp simulation and a tiny bit of EQ on the DAW’s tracks. But I try to be as minimalistic as possible, the lesser the plugins the better, in order to save CPU resources, and so that it’s not much of a pain to move my sound to another DAW in the future.

I really dislike sequenced guitars. People say powerchords are supposed to be “easier” to simulate, but to my ears most sequenced powerchords I’ve heard are as painfully obvious as any other kind of sequenced guitars.

Having said that, I think TJMusic is very close to reaching nice sounding acoustic strumming. At least it has some “life” to it, which is a must when simulating guitars I think.

I like your sound ;) Cheers

60 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 2 years
  • Has sold $5,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
+1 more
TrapezeArtiste says

I record all my guitars real with either a Freshman or Yamaha and acoustic or a Paul Reed Smith electric.

For effects I just use the Logic plug ins, the stereo doubler is good for acoustic.

I use a Neumann tlm 103 to record acoustics usually unless Im feeling lazy and I’ll just plug straight in! :-)

DefectiveContact
DefectiveContact Recent Posts Threads Started
6 posts
  • Has referred 10+ members
  • Has sold $100+ on Envato Market
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
+2 more
DefectiveContact says

Hey dude,

for e-guitar sounds I really recommend “Vir2 Electri6ity for Kontakt” and “AAS Strum Electric”. For a-guitar sounds, “AAS Strum Acoustic”. But these programs are really complex, you should intensely read the manual. Either I ask one of my friends to record the guitar track or I use this Software.

by
by
by
by
by
by