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rafaelrasalan
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Is when you see the result of the programmed website that doesn’t exactly look like what it’s supposed to be. Seriously, why do some developers do this that they act like they are the designer. You know for example a properly positioned elements and a good use of white space, then they just ruin the layout until it looks squeezed. Any of you encountered this kind of developer from hell?

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SupremeThemes
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According to my experiences, A LOT of developers hate whitespace;)

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rvision_
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Is when you see the result of the programmed website that doesn’t exactly look like what it’s supposed to be. Seriously, why do some developers do this that they act like they are the designer. You know for example a properly positioned elements and a good use of white space, then they just ruin the layout until it looks squeezed. Any of you encountered this kind of developer from hell?

Depends how big the ‘changes’ are. Web is not a print medium. And…

http://dowebsitesneedtolookexactlythesameineverybrowser.com/
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n-gee
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Yeah I’ve experienced this problem with various developers since I’ve started with webdesign. You need to tell them politely, that every pixel has a meaning. Sometimes they are just lazy. Everytime I find something wrong, I take a screenshot and I make comparison to my original file and explain what is wrong and why. Good developers will learn that soon.

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Net-Labs
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lol, better name this post designers from hell.

If you look through the posts of people’s templates being rejected you soon realize that understanding space and it’s application in design is a gift given to only a few.

Dumb, lazy, ignorant? hell no just not equipped with the same tools as you are.

Funny part is that clever psychologists tells us that the same chemical reaction that makes people understand things like white-space, makes them very angry at people that don’t.

My advice as a coder, take a cuppa and when you’re cooled off, let your developer know how you feel and how important this is to you, particularly if you’re working with a talented coder, because we all know how hard that is to get hold of.

Just don’t scare away all the good coders, because then you’re just left with those that really do not care.

Good luck

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CyberShot
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As a developer, what I have noticed working with designers is that sometime the design is not pixel perfect. Sure, it looks really good but isn’t pixel perfect. So the designer might have 10px padding/margin on one side and 12 pixel padding/margin on the other side so when you go and code that particular section, it ends up not working in the browser because you planned for 10px not 12 or vise versa. So now you have to figure out a way to make it work. A way to make it line up to match the design. So you change it the best way you can which means that when the designer looks at it, they think you just changed it because you wanted to when in reality you changed it because you had to in order to make it cross browser compatible.

If a design is pixel perfect. There would be no reason to change it.

I have also noticed that sometimes I can code a design to match perfectly with the psd and then later on you end up making some other css changes which unknowingly affect the position of things you coded days before. Just a mistake. Nobody can be perfect every time on the first try.

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FRESHFACE
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As a developer, what I have noticed working with designers is that sometime the design is not pixel perfect. Sure, it looks really good but isn’t pixel perfect. So the designer might have 10px padding/margin on one side and 12 pixel padding/margin on the other side so when you go and code that particular section, it ends up not working in the browser because you planned for 10px not 12 or vise versa. So now you have to figure out a way to make it work. A way to make it line up to match the design.

Yes, when this happens I call the designer a liar :) He simply makes stuff up, a stuff that just doesn’t add up. Helps if the designer is also a coder, preferably a good coder.

Also, pixel perfect height of white-space is overrated in webdesign. So as long as the dev have a pixel perfect horizontal spacing it’s fine, the little details in vertical spacing won’t be missed unless you have some really strict structure with rhythm which you usually don’t in themes and usually you don’t have that in your every-day static website project either.

But yeah, devs do not have results a picky designer would expect. It’s a mix of not seeing, not caring and juggling more fundamental problems like designers lies and creating a fitting structure.

Good way to approach this like a man is to learn how to code. That way you will solve most of those fundamental problems for the developer initially in your design (you won’t lie that much like I use to say) plus you can then take the devs result and take care of those little details on your own. ~“If you want something done right, do it yourself”

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quitenicestuff
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I think one of the problems is graphic designers who don’t understand code. In my opinion you can’t call yourself a web designer unless you can at least code the HTML /CSS part of your design. Sometimes some aspects of a design simply don’t translate well into code.

On the other hand I’m sure there are plenty of lousy developers out there who do just skip design details to save time/money but this mostly happens when you hire the super cheapo guy and in this case its fair to say you get what you pay for :p

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VF
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This is a known gap that occurs between a seasoned designer and coder. At some point, someone doesn’t knows the others side’s importance and end up with missing someones “obvious”.

Yin Yong says the more precise results the designer want… grrrr the designer should become developer and complete everything with own hands. In the same way if a developer wants optimized design that practically possible to complete as is, he/she should start designing :D

Btw, web requires multiple skills and maturity, there is no much room for hardcore designer and coder.

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entrophia
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I think one of the problems is graphic designers who don’t understand code. In my opinion you can’t call yourself a web designer unless you can at least code the HTML /CSS part of your design. Sometimes some aspects of a design simply don’t translate well into code. On the other hand I’m sure there are plenty of lousy developers out there who do just skip design details to save time/money but this mostly happens when you hire the super cheapo guy and in this case its fair to say you get what you pay for :p

Totally agree!

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