699 posts Allegro120 Composer
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Allegro120
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Do you think of this guys? I think all we abuse some of the compressor :)

Has come to all the limit?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Gmex_4hreQ&feature=player_embedded
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gbiasillo
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Yes, loudness war sucks. It’s prevalent everywhere. I hate going to the cinema now as the soudn is way too loud. The soundtracks are pumped way up AND the cinema pump it up waaaay too loud as well, on speakers that simply can’t take it. My ears feel like they are bleeding after watching a film these days.

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Allegro120
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Those who love the composition for film I think we are the most affected. these are nuanced compositions, with many ups and downs, very high in sensitivity. All this is being lost to win the battle of the loudness. But we do if buyers choose the most volume?

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garethcoker
Envato team
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I went to see The Dark Knight Rises yesterday. 1) The film was quite a mess, and 2) the sound and music was too loud (there was also way too much music, sorry Hans and Chris)

I expect to go to IMAX to have the premium watching experience (especially at $19 a ticket), but instead I left the cinema feeling almost deafened. And I LOVE loud stuff usually, but the audio of Dark Knight had no contour, no shape, it was just loud the whole time and it took away all the dramaticism.

The whole thing felt like a music video with Michael Bay sound effects.

The best moment in the movie for me was when there was total silence just before the final streetfight scene. Pure bliss!!

Anyway, before I get into a massive rant about how average the Dark Knight Rises is, I’d rather point you to this amazing article yesterday regarding the loudness war in cinema (not in music).

http://mostlyfilm.com/2012/08/01/betting-on-red/

Finally, it’s important to remember, that composers who are writing original score don’t usually master their tracks before they send them to the dub stage. Tracks that are mastered are production tracks (like here on Audiojungle, or Two Steps From Hell, APM , etc…) but original score mastering is not in the hands of the composer.

I guess if you don’t want your score to be mangled to hell, don’t do action movies ;)

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BCrutchfield
Envato team
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The only thing that I can recommend against is the “Enhanced Theatre Experience”. Saw The Avengers in a theatre in Burbank with that and I swear it was only ‘enhanced’ by the addition of at least 25 extra subwoofers, and an average level of at least 120dB.

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fifty_tons
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I don’t get it, why are they doing that in movie theatres? I mean, although the loudness war has its own marketing logic (so to speak) what good would it do to blast the speakers in a movie theatre of the actual movie people already paid to see?

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James-Lee-Grey
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Those who love the composition for film I think we are the most affected. these are nuanced compositions, with many ups and downs, very high in sensitivity. All this is being lost to win the battle of the loudness.
True.

But we do if buyers choose the most volume?
Possible to do a couple versions of the same track – for example for those who love vivacity and brilliance with all the nuances of performance and for those who like that would be simply LOOOOUUUUDD . :D
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Allegro120
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Those who love the composition for film I think we are the most affected. these are nuanced compositions, with many ups and downs, very high in sensitivity. All this is being lost to win the battle of the loudness.
True.

But we do if buyers choose the most volume?
Possible to do a couple versions of the same track – for example for those who love vivacity and brilliance with all the nuances of performance and for those who like that would be simply LOOOOUUUUDD . :D

Not a bad idea. But how we would present? Version A Loudness +4. Version B Normal Loudness. :)

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HarryAndre
says

Yes, very good idea. And I suppose we could say highly compressed file? And why not create our own initianls? Just like there is HD for high definition, there should be HC for high compression! :)

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adammonroe
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Yes, I am getting quite tired of every song everywhere having to be compressed.

Originally, it was a useful practice for radio, as it can be hard to hear music properly in the car, but now it’s becoming quite prevalent and fatigues my ear. If you really think about it, a lot of the time it’s probably not necessary, because we are making background music. But I think we have gotten to the point where if something ISN ’T compressed, it sounds unprofessional to people.

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