The_Auditory_Group
The_Auditory_Group Recent Posts Threads Started
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The_Auditory_Group says

Wow! So far so good! Keep the great tips coming guys, I learn something new every time!

Hopefully you guys are to!

All the best

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Mihai_Sorohan says

One trick I make sometimes with guitars but I’ve heard it on… cimbalom :))))
Instrument panned on a side and the room or the reverb panned to the other side. With cimbalom you have two mics, so you put the instrument in the mix with a smaller stereo field, then you pan the reverb on the other side. Nothing really extreme.
With guitars, close mic to the left, room mic to the right, and the other guitar vice-versa.

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FactoryofMusic says

Some tips from my end:

- Parallel compression on the master can add some energy to the track. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn’t.

- A/B with “commercial” tracks that are in the same genre / feeling as your own. Could be eye opening!

- Doubling can be very useful sometimes. For example; two difference grand piano’s. One panned slightly to the left, the other one slightly to the right. Run them through the same (hall) reverb. Edit the midi a bit different (volume and timing)

- The quantize functions can be very handy, but use only when necessary!

Good luck!

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FxProSound says

Your vocal tracks sound weak and thin in rock mix. Add doubled tracks – one in hard left, second hard right. Move first few ms forward, second few ms back, Tune first up about 5-10 cents, second down about 5-10 cents. It can simulate effect like in Nickelback songs. Of course natural takes sound better :) but artists sometimes can’t give it to you.

PatrickAThompson
PatrickAThompson Recent Posts Threads Started
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PatrickAThompson says

For orchestral composers:

Keep an eye\ear on your chord voicing in lower rangers. Using doubled 5ths and 3rds in the lower areas will leave your piece sounding muddy. I RARELY dabble with any 3rd below the F below middle C…

Of course, there are times\styles where you want a thick, muddy texture down there (horror flicks, for example).... and that’s one way to do it.

Stick with your bass note… or double it an octave up… but don’t go overboard.

It’s just how the human ear hears… The normal listener can’t distinguish too many separate notes in that range.

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reubenchng says

If you’re recording vocals and you don’t have a pop filter (or you forgot yours at home) get an elastic band and attach a pencil facing the direction of the singer to the microphone (not pointing at the singer, pointing upwards). It may sound stupid and it may look like it has no effect but it actually does a decent job of dispersing the sound pulse, certainly a better job than not using any form of filter at all. Try it, you’ll be surprised!

Actually when I forgot my pop filter I’ll just use a sock and put it over the microphone. :D

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TortoiseTree says


If you’re recording vocals and you don’t have a pop filter (or you forgot yours at home) get an elastic band and attach a pencil facing the direction of the singer to the microphone (not pointing at the singer, pointing upwards). It may sound stupid and it may look like it has no effect but it actually does a decent job of dispersing the sound pulse, certainly a better job than not using any form of filter at all. Try it, you’ll be surprised!
Actually when I forgot my pop filter I’ll just use a sock and put it over the microphone. :D

That’s genius! OMG …. so much simpler than my idea!

Stuck_in_the_Basement
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Stuck_in_the_Basement Reviewer says

Actually when I forgot my pop filter I’ll just use a sock and put it over the microphone. :D
I have found myself using my moms’ tights over a wire hanger that I had bent into a circle in the past! :D
It does work but it can be tedious to get the wire to stay on the mic stand!
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CraigHall says

Don’t overlook the simplest of functions in your DAW . For me the ‘random’ value in Pro Tools is a great way to humanise velocities and note start times. Logic actually has a humanise function that adjusts both of these together.

Buy some ear plugs that you can keep on you at all times, I have mine in a small case on my keys – that way i’m never without them, you’ll never know when you’ll need them and it will save your hearing!

Also, one of the best tips I was ever given is take your time to learn about spatial effects on busses (reverbs, delays). This can be a big time saver and also save precious processing power!

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adammonroe says

As others have said, doubling and panning tracks is great for things like Reverb. I would go further and argue that it’s almost always better to apply effects like that to the duplicate of a track rather than the original track. That way, you have control over things like panning, and you can adjust the wet/dry mix easily through the volume/trim sliders instead of having to go back into your plugin. You can accomplish the same thing with sends/buses, but I like to have the direct, clean track for reference and presence, especially as it helps when deciding just how wet/dry you want the effect. Of course when it comes to things like equalization, it should always be applied directly or through a bus.

It also helps to have certain presets figured out and saved. For example, basic equalization presets for things like drums. Yeah, you aren’t going to use the same equalization preset on a snare every time, but you’ll at least have somewhere to start from. If you are recording the SAME instruments in the SAME location, it can be a huge time-saver.

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