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Kurlykovs says

Hi every one i am new to recording guitar via recording interfaces and DAWs so i was wondering about your opinions about M-Audio fast track pro interfaces or Line 6 Ux2 and the best Daw to record guitar with. Pro tools VS Ableton. And some interfaces record at 24bit/44khz and some do 24/92khz would Khz number effect my recording quality or not.

Thanks for your answers/Opinions.

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JohnRosso says

Choose any interface with Hi-z input. Line6 is not great enough to work with audio. I have Focusrite Scarlett 2i2. it has great performance, preamps and recording guitar thrue 2i2 is great. I like it. So, there is no DAW specific for recording guitar. Any good DAW can comfortable recording. For guitar 44khz or 92khz is not necessary. May be for drum overhead . Not for guitar. Use 44khz and it would be awesome ;)

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adammonroe says

I think it will come down more to your microphone than it will your DAW or sample rate…unless you are going DI. Are you recording electric or acoustic guitar? The audio interface (and DAW ) isn’t going to make much of difference (unless you can get something with a nice preamp, but even then my opinion is that the difference is negligible, unless you are willing to shell out some decent cash.) If you are going DI on the guitar, I’d get the cheaper interface and put the difference toward a good amp-modeling plugin for your DAW . NOTE* -I see that the Line 6 Ux2 comes with a tone-modeling plugin – I’d probably buy that one

If you are recording an amp, I’d buy the cheaper interface and put the difference towards a decent dynamic mic…unless you already have one.

*IMO 24 bit, 44 khz is more than enough.

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jhunger says

Pretty much any DAW will do, and as far as interfaces go they’re all under the “pretty good” umbrella until you start shelling out for Lynx/Apogee/Lavry etc. Another vote for 24 bit /44 khz as being just fine.

You didn’t specify whether you’re recording acoustic or electric – the answers are quite different depending.

If you’re recording acoustic IMO you will almost always be better off using even an inexpensive mic than plugging in direct. If you can afford it, I’d recommend a decent small diaphragm condenser like the Rode NT5 , Studio Projects C4, Oktava MK012 , or you could go a bit less expensive with MXL , AKG perception, Avantone, Audio Technica – there’s a bunch out there. Or you could use a dynamic mic like the Shure SM57 , though it won’t capture the intricate tones of an acoustic as well.

If you’re recording electric, I agree with everything Adam said. The best bet is probably direct with a good amp modeling software (you can probably get a great deal these days, depending on where you are, since we’re heading into the US holidays). For instance Native Instruments Guitar Rig, which comes standalone but is a much better deal when bundled with Komplete. If you’ve already got the amp, use a dynamic mic (again, the SM57 is a decent bet) and mic up your amp. With both acoustic and electric mic placement will make a huge difference – there’s a lot of information and ideas online around this.

Preamps are also important, but here again to get much better than what is in your interface you’re starting to look at some serious $$. Some (relatively) economical alternatives are the Focusrite ISA One, FMR Audio RNP , and the Golden Age Pre 73, but even these will clock in around $300-500, and you won’t hear as much difference as between mics – it really gets to be fine tuning at that point.

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Kurlykovs says

Thanks for your opinion guys. and yes i was looking in to recording an electric guitar. i am trying to read through your posts and understand everything right :) So if i buy a recording interface i will need to have something like Native instruments Guitar Rig to have different sounds/effects right? or would an interface + guitar processor (something like DIGITECH ) plugged in to it do the job? And what do you think about http://line6.com/podstudiokb37/ it seems like it has the Pod farm that will give me the preamps and some keys to make some midi sounds like drums or what ever :) and does electric guitar quality matter that much probably does but since it is all turned in to Digital sound in the end does it?

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adammonroe says

In my experience with recording and playing electric guitar, I’ve found that the quality of your guitar isn’t nearly as important as your amp/pedals/modeling program, ect. There are differences in tone quality between guitars, different body styles, different pickups ect, to be sure, but they will never go as far when it comes to shaping your tone as a good amp or pedal board. An effects processor between your guitar and your interface can shape your tone somewhat, but I would lean towards something like Guitar Rig or Podfarm because these programs are getting extremely versatile in terms of being able to simulate not only pedal effects but amp styles and even microphones and mic placement, and the differences between an amped-up guitar with expensive effects pedals and good modeling software seem to be growing smaller and smaller every year.

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permian says

If you’re not going to play live gigs, and just want recording – you actually do not need multi-effect “hard” processor (they call it “multi effects pedal”) – since you got DI, you can process it through vst’s anyway you want. As for me, I’ve Line6 hardware, and it covers all my guitar needs for both playing and recording (though I’m occasionaly using different not-line6’s cabs IRs in processing). It has some inconvenience though – I have to keep my gear connected to the comp and powered on to work with line6’s PodFarm vst; also (the most annoying) it’s not very stable.
So if I were you, I’d try free versions of soft like amplitube, guitar rig, pod farm etc, and then decide, which of them would be good for my purposes.

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permian says

...and does electric guitar quality matter that much probably does but since it is all turned in to Digital sound in the end does it?

I bet neither you nor the rest of the humanity would be able to hear differences between the sounds (processed in many different ways) of fancy original Fender and its chinese 100$-replica in a scientifically correct blind study.

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Kurlykovs says

Thanks a lot for taking your time and replying to my post guys!

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johnny625 says


...and does electric guitar quality matter that much probably does but since it is all turned in to Digital sound in the end does it?
I bet neither you nor the rest of the humanity would be able to hear differences between the sounds (processed in many different ways) of fancy original Fender and its chinese 100$-replica in a scientifically correct blind study.

I agree. There so much processing that goes into electric guitars these days that the original timbre is masked beyond recognition. Besides, the average listener hasn’t got a clue about how different guitars (Fender, Gibson and their copies) sound. All they care about is nice fat riffs that they can headbang to, and spicy solos that they can play air guitar to. :)

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