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ThomasVoMusic says

Hey,

For me, one of the more difficult aspect of music composition is giving it a title. And it’s just more difficult when it’s an instrumental composition too, in my opinion. I mean sometimes I know exactly what I want it to be called, but sometimes I just can’t find the right word(s) that can match the music. Maybe it’s just me XD

I’m just curious, how do you guys go about coming up with a name for your music? Do you entitle it first and then write or what? Or do you not really care? :P

Thomas

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jhunger says

Hey Thomas,

It’s not just you :). I totally agree with you. Writing music is easy for me, but lyrics are extremely hard and that appears to extend to naming songs. My first 40 tunes were called ‘Acoustic Loop – [n]’ for that reason, but it was starting to get embarrassing so I have been naming them since.

I almost always name the song after it’s mixed down at the very last possible moment. I think this is a good process because if I name it first it sort of pigeonholes the music before I get started. Sometimes the names are obvious, and other times something really out there just pops into my head (I have one in my SeaportSound profile called ‘Electro Whale’ because that’s just what came to me for some reason).

However (regardless of the fact that I don’t always follow this advice) I think that naming songs accurately is extremely important. If the titles are meaningless, it’s not helpful to a buyer trolling for a particular sound.

—Joel

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BCrutchfield Envato team says

I have the same problem with figuring out what to name my stuff. I’ve found out that naming or choosing a direction before writing never really works because I have extreme ADD or something. I’ll start up a Logic session to start noodling around in, and then save it as like “corporate ideas 4/26/11” and then open it the next day and decide I want to write a piano piece, and thats what it ends up as.

As for naming I make copious use of thesaurus.com and I type in “happy” or “contemplative” or whatever the mood of the piece is and then name the track something out of that list that seems cool to me at the moment. One of my tracks is called “Euphoria” and I got that name from a search for “happy” on that site, haha.

Lately I’ve started naming my stuff with 3 word titles with the first word being the mood descriptor that I pull from thesaurus.com such as “happy”, “funny”, “serene” etc. The 2nd word I try to add in what instrumentation or category it is such as “acoustic”, “orchestral”, “cinematic”, “comedy”, etc. For the 3rd word I’ll say what format the track is such as “intro”, “trailer”, “loop”, etc.

This formatting will have you end up with track names like “Serene Cinematic Trailer”, “Happy Corporate Logo”, “Funny Video Game Loop”. While they aren’t the most creative or amazing titles around I hope that they at least give the customer some idea of what they’ll be hearing once they click on the track.

Then again I’ve seen some weirdly named tracks that do great on the marketplace. Maybe you should just name your next track “Leaf” or after some other random inanimate object with no bearing on your music, and it’ll sell wonderfully! haha

Anyway, hopefully you’ll figure out a way that works for you soon, because it really is a pain figuring out what to do with instrumental music track titles.

-BC

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Dirtyflint says

I have no problem with it: I know in English only ten or fifteen words – these words I use for the name track. :P

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plastic3 says

Don’t be so modest, Dirtyflint, i think, i need new translater to read your names: Mushrooms, Rapata-Chapata, Alternating V, Click-O-Lator…Ha-ha:)))

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TimMcMorris says

Don’t be so modest, Dirtyflint, i think, i need new translater to read your names: Mushrooms, Rapata-Chapata, Alternating V, Click-O-Lator…Ha-ha:)))

Hahaha very funny !!!

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smelin says

Hey Thomas,

I think the beauty of writing music is that every composer is unique – and this is equally true with titles. Everyone finds a pattern to naming their music eventually, so start trying it out.

The majority of my titles are emotions or scenes (ex. Indecisive or Mystic Falls). I always think cinematically when writing, so it’s just habit to assign “visual” names to my music. It’s also a habit of mine (and I consider it a good one) to immediately make up a name for a piece after its first session. This title rarely makes it to the final version, but gives me an idea to come back to when I’m searching through folders and eagerly looking for a specific genre. Whether you choose to do the same, I strongly advise NOT to name all of your sessions “Untitled 1”, “Untitled 2”, etc… or anything similar.

-Steven

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palmtreep says

I never name my tracks until they are finished. When I get finished with them, I listen through them a few times. Trying to think of how the track makes me feel. I close my eyes and try to think of the imagery that comes to mind when the track plays. As for my tracks that have Latin in them, it really depends. I already have the name picked out by then, but sometimes, in Latin it just sounds better :P

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SonicCube says

Hello Thomas

I personally start with an idea or feeling and most of the time, i keep this feeling / idea as the trackname. There are some of the tracks, that have evolved to something completely different while working on it. Those are the ones, where i sometimes also have trouble to find a brief description or name :)

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Synchrotron says

Bumping an old thread here, but I recently came across this problem when I was asked how I wanted my tracks to be renamed during the review process. The tracks were titled as Minimal House 01 – Tokyo, Minimal House 02 – Berlin and so on. This was to both give them a clear title according to style as well as an individual title. As a series of tracks within a style. Although the review staff (Hey Adrien, thanks for all the help!) wanted me to choose either the style title (Minimal House 01) or the individual title (Tokyo, Berlin) without a dash in between.

I decided to go with simply naming them Minimal House 01, 02 and so forth. Although now I’m starting to think it will get too anonymous in the long run.

What do you guys think, should I have gone with individual titles, instead of styles and number?

First post here on the AudioJungle-forum, decided to dig up an old thread instead of creating a new one, hope that’s ok. Really liking the AudioJungle-marketplace. Easy to work with and friendly staff!

Cheers!

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