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TortoiseTree says

Hey guys, I was reading some stuff from a forum conversation I had with Taco and JC Kerosene a while ago and one thing that came up was having an account with a focus and how this leads to sales. Since there is a team behind my account and we pretty much upload whatever we like we have a very spread out and nearly random portfolio yet I was comparing our account to others, and those that have chosen to focus on a few genres have come out the most successful.

If you think about the top authors here and name them then a certain genre immediately springs to mind:

Tim McMorris: Motivational and Pop

Gareth Coker: Cinematic

Symphony of spectres: Cinematic

Jhunger: Acoustic and folk

Plastic3: Electronic music

Vaisnava: World and ambient

And even though many of these authors dabble in other genres (and do so extremely well) they’ve built up their fanbase so that it doesn’t matter. I even compared our account to others our age and those with focused songs and genres are doing a lot better. So here is my question to you fellow authors… do you agree with my little theory here about focusing accounts? Now obviously there are plenty of authors I have left out from my name-genre correlation chart and I know there are others who seem to have succeeded whilst still not having a specific genre related to them. But still, for a junior author…. is a genre specific account best? Should one create separate accounts to dabble in different genres even though this would mean taking longer to get the commission rates you want? Opinions people!!

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reubenchng says

Well, if it’s not too much work then why not? Being specialized in something like a niche would be good if you’re aiming to brand. Well, just a thought

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SonicCube says

I do whatever i’d like to do (and be able to as well for sure). Not a BIG author i am, but still selling good with a very divers portfolio :)

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tacoMusic says

Personally, I think it’s a good route, but Pink Zebra who is very successful has quite a diverse portfolio as well, so I think it can work both ways.

A little caveat is that if you have multiple accounts, it’s multiple maintenance (publicising, artwork etc.) as well as making it harder for you to reach the income % thresholds i.e. earning 70% eventually…

Nice post TortoiseTree :)

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AlumoAudio says

Hi TortoiseTree,

I think this is a very interesting question – one that I asked myself when I joined AJ.

However, from what I have seen, I’ve also come to the conclusion that in general, at least for a new AJ author, a focused portfolio seems to fair better than a totally varied one.

This may be partly due to building up a reputation in a certain genre and making a name for oneself, especially with fellow Videohive authors. This creates repeat business. Also, I believe that authors that produce a varied portfolio, such as PinkZebra, already have a large existing customer base, so they will now have the freedom to explore other genres, without sacrificing sales.

Personally, I have opted to stay predominantly with the corporate / motivational genres, simply because this is what I’m best at creating and it seems to attract healthy sales on the marketplace.

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ZtarrZound says

I think the case with the authors you mentioned is that they do what they are good at, are passionate about, and want to be good at. It’s cool to dabble elsewhere if you have the skills and are so inspired to dabble but I say stick to what you enjoy doing for the most part.

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solarsound says

I think the key word is niche. Focusing on what makes you different from other authors. Soundroll has a certain style. Tim has a defined “style”. As does other authors such as j hunger and pink zebra. For instance pink zebra uses a very clever marketing technique, which isnt really related to the music at all. But it puts an imprint in peoples minds. Also maybe someone uses a certain type of instrumentation or writing that can cross over to many different styles. So more importantly than genre, what is your “niche”?

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TortoiseTree says

@ TacoMusic: Thanks man and congrats on being featured, I hope it brings you plenty of sales and customers! I too have considered that there would be far too much work if you had an account for each genre, not to mention the hell of taking that author test again! I did have pinkzebra in mind as someone that dabbles in everything yet has succeeded, but if you look him up he seems to have already had tons of experience in the biz and I think he brings in his own clients.

@ AlumoAudio + SolarSound: Yeah PinkZebra’s marketing, client base and branding (and of course great music) has really led to his success. It really seems to be about finding your sound or “niche” eh?

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