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Cryonics says

Hi, and here’s my opinion on this subject: You can remove the tracks with 0 sales, but then you never know how much times you would be able to sell, and maybe even a Extended Licence!

Good luck :)

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Sophonic says

I feel most of the time a song has zero sales for a reason. If you are an exclusive author and can find another use for it, than it makes sense to do something else productive with it. I would take it down after a decent amount of time has gone by and promotion for the item has been done with no results. Although if you are non-exclusive cant see the problem with just leaving it and also trying to sell it elsewhere.

Although it does look bad if you have a large portfolio and alot of songs are at zero it kind of is unattractive to buyers looking through you portfolio. It stinks that some real gems go without a sale, but if items have sales numbers next to them it makes buyers want it. People feel secure they are making a good choice if they see others have made the same choice.

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tacoMusic says

It’s an obvious thing to say, but even if a track is good enough commercially to sell and gets accepted here, it really doesn’t mean it’s right for the market here. With the exception of our latest track which has done well (corporate motivational surprise surprise), we’re currently experiencing this with the previous 5/6 tracks which all have 0 sales.

It looks pants when you see that as a customer, so seriously considering removing them despite thinking the quality and tracks are fine and them having been up for less than a month or two, it just seems there’s no market for those types of tracks here. I think it does more damage than good having a sequence of non-sellers in your portfolio.

thesensercomplex
thesensercomplex Recent Posts Threads Started
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thesensercomplex says

BOOM ! Just sold a track thats been on AJ for six months, very little hits according to it’s analytics. Sure I’ve taken tracks off of AJ, some tracks I believe belongs on AJ regardless of its sales record. You’ll just have to trust on instinct. You can’t just assume that the buyer for a track is always on AJ looking all the time. Good luck and cheers!

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ThePantherLab says

I wouldn`t recommend deleting 0 sales items. The whole point of a library, in my opinion, is to have a collection of items that stay there for potential customers and sales. Just the other day I sold an item that has been sitting for quite a few months. If the item was removed, that would be one less sale in my pocket. Every item counts.

All the best

;)

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anthonymarks says

I’ve had a couple of things sell after being up there, apparently unloved, for months. I think as your overall sales rate improves, it matters less that individual tracks are unsold. Personally if I were a customer rather than a supplier, I’d be looking for things that appealed to me – and would feel glad to find something a bit rare and unknown. So it wouldn’t really bother me if the track I wanted had a low (or zero) sales rate. I hope at least some potential customers feel the same way (though I agree with what was said up-thread: some people do feel “comforted” by the idea that other people have bought and used a track before them). I have plenty of unsold tracks but I won’t be taking them down just yet. You never know.

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muscma01 says

I would say no on deleting an item in your portfolio. I know the temptation to re-work it, tinker with it, have a portfolio that makes it look like every piece of music you’ve made is a golden hit, or whatever, it doesn’t really hurt. It could sell a year from now with an extended license or all of a sudden it just becomes popular. I guess the point is with this type of work everything is just little moves every day. Make a new track, do a little promotion, write a little blog, ect. It’s a marathon game, where quality counts, along with quantity. Remember just cause you don’t like a track, it got approved, which means the quality is there, and in the future it might be right for someone. Just my two cents.

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