SnoopyIndustries
SnoopyIndustries Recent Posts Threads Started
372 posts
  • Has sold $40,000+ on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 2 years
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SnoopyIndustries says

@Ben,

For me, the breaking point occurred last summer. I was still doing both things (freelancing and full time job) when I went with my GF on an amazing 1 week holiday which was very expensive compared to what I was earning. And when laying on the beach with the sun/wind/sand/sea playing with my senses and with a beer in my hand I realized that I couldn’t have that as easily if I would keep working a full time job, so the decision practically made itself. Get yourself one of those vacations and you’ll see what I’m talking about. And don’t worry about the money. No offense intended of course, but you’re not paid what I would have imagined one in UK would get, especially given how expensive life is there.You’re going to top that, don’t worry, just go with your gut. You’re young, what’s the point in being away from your loved one(s) when you could be with them 24/7 and making a lot of money too?

8 posts
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danawritescode says

I am not a TF author (yet) but I work for a company that is very flexible with working remotely and I’ve also worked as a contractor from home in the past.

I think being able to successfully work from home depends a lot on you. I get distracted easily, and being at home just makes it worse. When I work from home I take far too many breaks—going to the kitchen to make a snack, watching TV, etc. It’s much more difficult to stay focused for an extended period of time at home than it is when I’m at my office. If I were to ever become fully self-employed by either freelancing or TF, I would probably have to rent an office space outside of my home because it would drive me crazy to never leave the house and be around other people.

1034 posts
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BenSheppard says

I am not a TF author (yet) but I work for a company that is very flexible with working remotely and I’ve also worked as a contractor from home in the past. I think being able to successfully work from home depends a lot on you. I get distracted easily, and being at home just makes it worse. When I work from home I take far too many breaks—going to the kitchen to make a snack, watching TV, etc. It’s much more difficult to stay focused for an extended period of time at home than it is when I’m at my office. If I were to ever become fully self-employed by either freelancing or TF, I would probably have to rent an office space outside of my home because it would drive me crazy to never leave the house and be around other people.

Do you find it hard finding at home contracts or finding a company that will allow you to work form home?

I don’t find that too hard I’ve been working from “home” since I was about 14 so I’ve got into my mind set work is different to relaxing

1312 posts
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LGLab says

Before flash died I used to do short term on site contract jobs, and they are quite well paid (best was £300/day)...so if you do a couple of weeks once in a while it nicely tops up the bank account. Also, working from home can be a bit boring so spending a couple of weeks with new people is quite nice, and agency atmosphere is pretty chilled out. I used to stay in hotels for that time, which you can claim on your expenses.

Have a look on http://www.cwjobs.co.uk/ and http://www.jobsite.co.uk/ – Upload your resume on there for a start, it’s surprising how quickly people call you ;-)

8 posts
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danawritescode says

I don’t find that too hard I’ve been working from “home” since I was about 14 so I’ve got into my mind set work is different to relaxing

No, but I’m not sure how the job market in the UK compares to the US.

I think the opportunities to work from home are greater if you get hired on as a contractor through a temp agency (you can get long term contracts that are 1 year+) rather than a salaried employee that is a direct hire.

SnoopyIndustries
SnoopyIndustries Recent Posts Threads Started
372 posts
  • Has sold $40,000+ on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 2 years
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SnoopyIndustries says

You should really stop worrying about money. The only worry would be (in my book) as mentioned earlier, some experience in a company. In my country at least, whenever you go and tell somebody that you have this amazing portfolio working as a freelancer they usually look at you like some kind of unemployed smuck who gets a few bucks from here and there and never treat you as serious as they should, regardless if you know a bit or if you know more than their whole company put together.It’s a mindset problem. I think (and hope) US and UK are better in this regard. There are hundreds of forums and freelance sites like freelancer/elance/odesk who present a lot of opportunities for everybody, so that’s not the problem.

The only real problems are: 1. You will have to hope to get a more stable customer so that you won’t have to live out of projects every time. Working out of projects might be more satisfying financial-wise, with a nice php project on which you work a couple of weeks being able to bring up to $1500-2000k, but it would also be a bit more worrying because you would get 1 week periods where you have nothing to do. Anyway, this was a problem in the past for me, before I found a few serious and long term contracts; now that TF is also around you can always work on TF, search for projects, then whenever you have a project halt TF and do that, it’s a perfect balance.

2. Another major problem, at least for US,UK, AU, CA, is that on these forums/freelance sites there are a lot of third world country members (like India, Pakistan, Vietnam, Romania, Ukraine and so on) who would love getting 100 dollars on a job a US guy wouldn’t even bother to read the documentation for that money. So the level of income is “ruined” by such bids.

1839 posts Don't Worry, Be Happy
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FinalDestiny says

When you’re 20+, “stop worrying about money” just won’t work. And c’mon, $1k/month from freelancing is hard as hell if you’re new or don’t know anyone. $1-2k / month may sound quite easy for me now since I have connections, users that know my work, I’m elite, but for a new author trust me, it’s extremely hard. To get some nice earnings I suppose you need either a partnership and develop a top-selling item(quite hard to get if you’re new around) or buy a design yourself and get all the earnings for it, but there’s no guarantee it will actually sell.

If you’re new, you give like 45-50% to Envato, from the rest you must pay taxes to be legal and so on. It’s up to you what you want to do. I chose this way knowing that this is an extremely big risk, but I love risks, I love what I do, I’m young(don’t need that much money) and I prefer risking with the possibility of starting a company myself instead of choosing the safe way(hiring as intern, junior, normal employee) with normal salary and being normal, as everyone else.

But, again, this is me, you should re-evaluate your options and decide what you want to do.

SnoopyIndustries
SnoopyIndustries Recent Posts Threads Started
372 posts
  • Has sold $40,000+ on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 2 years
+3 more
SnoopyIndustries says

It’s true that beginnings are harder, and I’m not talking about TF, but freelancing as a whole. From what I understand from Ben he’s been around since he was 14, so “connections” shouldn’t be a problem, and a nice portfolio shouldn’t be either. When you’re new in a marketplace it’s always hard, be it Themeforest, Odesk or anything else, but as FinalDestiny claimed, this is a risk well taken and a very “fun” one to take.

1034 posts
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BenSheppard says

Think I should clear some things up

This isn’t a should I, Shouldn’t I kind of thing, my entire heart and soul is into becoming freelancer etc, just wanted to hear about your experiences first hand.
I am currently partnered with someone and we should be releasing our first template he is a rather well known and talented designer.

Having lots of money doesn’t bother me in the slightest, I only want what I need. As long as the bills get paid and I can afford food I’ll be a happy man

I’m more than happy with risks! I know what I’m singing up for!

Things like “freelance and odesk etc” I’m not a fan of too much as they seem to devalue the work that goes into a website, with an entire brand new website up and running with account custom php code etc etc etc for like $100 just seems pointless

228 posts
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corethemes says

At least you can find some work, even some miles away from your family / friends / etc. Here in Greece unemployment is at more than 25% (55% under 30 years old) and the Web Design field is hit incredibly hard.

Most people / companies see having a website as a luxury or rather, a quality one. As such, they don’t pay for one, or they flock to the 100€ premade cr%*.

If it weren’t for TF and me teaching a couple of classes in High School, i’d literally have 0 income.

All I’m saying is, try to always get the best of what you have (don’t know, maybe It’s the other way around) :-D

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