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Lmz says

I see you’re mixing in Logic. Here’s a few of my thoughts on mixing in Logic:

Summing Engine – Logic doesn’t sum tracks together very well, or (to be more specific) very clearly. Usually isn’t a big deal for 5 – 10 tracks, or pieces that aren’t very dense. But, if you have a session with a lot of tracks that fill up the frequency range and then some, you are going to working extra hard trying to achieve some sort of clarity. Things start sounding more and more like Soundcloud (which sounds awful due to their conversion process). In the process of trying to achieve clarity, you’ll use a bunch of plugins that will, little by little, degrade the sound so it’s almost like a double-edged sword. Using better mixing plugins well help, as long as you use them appropriately.

Stereo Imaging – Logic handels stereo imaging poorly, or again, things aren’t as clear. But, unlike the summing engine thing, there are a couple things to try and improve this. First, I turn the pan law to ‘0’ (project settings/Audio/Pan Law). At this setting, it seems to me like it’s easier to get tracks more into the left and right channels so everything isn’t overlapping as much in the center channel (which makes since when you set a pan law to ‘0’). Second, use Logic’s directional mixer plugin or even better, download the Stereo Tool from Flux plugins to use for panning. It’s free and, in my opinion, an absolute must to have for anyone mixing. By the way, mono tracks pan well in Logic. It’s only stereo tracks that I feel have this issue.

The actual ‘Sound’ of Logic- This one is a big one. All DAWs sound different. It’s not very noticeable with just a handful of tracks but becomes more apparent as you add more and more tracks. It’s a subtle thing but it might be the thing you are fighting with in your mix. Logic has a very ‘rounded’ sort of sound. It’s hard to get bright mixes out of Logic without sounding harsh in the highs and high mids. The bass and sub bass isn’t as clear compared to other DAWs. Low mids seem to have a lot presence in the balance of frequencies. Upper highs seem ok. A good EQ and proper EQ’ing will help. DMG Equality is a nice EQ for around $160.

I mixed in Logic for a long time struggling to find clarity and getting mixes brighter without becoming harsh. I always wondered how this mixer I knew got really clear mixes that were bright but not harsh. The main difference between us was the DAW . He was working in Pro Tools. I switched over to mixing in Pro Tools and found I didn’t have to work as hard to get the mix I was looking for. That’s also when I noticed a difference in sound between the two programs.

Another mixing DAW to try is Mixbus. DAW based entirely on the sound of a Harrison console. Not great for editing and no midi capability last time I checked but, it sounds great.

Logic doesn’t sound bad. It’s a choice and it’s all in how you work with it. The points I mentioned are subtle things that I feel added up to a point in my mixes that I was fighting the way the DAW sounds. I struggled with getting clarity and tolerable brightness out of it so I mix in Pro Tools now.

Not sure if this whole thing helps and maybe some might think I’m a bit looney for thinking DAWs sound different. But, that’s been my experience.

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Stuck_in_the_Basement Envato team says

Not sure if this whole thing helps and maybe some might think I’m a bit looney for thinking DAWs sound different. But, that’s been my experience.
No, you are not looney! About 7-8 years ago, I used mostly Cubase for all my mixes. I then switched to Pro-Tools and noticed quite the difference. In fact, I mixed a track with the exact same parameters in both DAWs and the results were chocking. The mix in Cubase turned out way muddier. Ever since, I never looked back. I have always used Pro-Tools.
Cubase might have improved throughout the years but it doesn’t matter, I am just more comfortable mixing in Pro-Tools anymore.
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tacoMusic says

Thanks for your thoughts on this Lmz – I’ve actually been talking a lot about this with a film composer friend of mine a lot who says Logic sounds like dog dirt. I’ve had my suspicions as before Logic I was on Digital Performer which sounded SO much better to my ears, but I had to leave it because of its awful interface.

I hear quite a few film composers compose in Logic and then mix in Pro Tools, something I’ve been considering for a while but I’ve been intimidated a bit by PT each time I look around. I went to a mixing masterclass where Jake Jackson was doing a live mixing session of the 007 Bond game (soundtrack by Richard Jacques), and I was blown away by how complex it was trying to route stuff around. However, I’m sure it’s not as complicated as I’m thinking and just need to get my hands dirty. Also seems to be essential for passing over stems to mix engineers these days.

I’ve downloaded that plugin Stereo Tool by Flux plugins, so will have a play around with that. I have a plugin by Voxengo called GlissEQ which I quite like and usually use for EQing tracks, but I’ll also take a look at DMG Equality like you suggest.

Lastly, I can’t ignore an important factor which is that I need to acoustically treat my room properly so I can use the two sets of monitors to their full potential (I’ve got a pair of JBL LSR25ps (ooooold now) and Equator D5’s which are new and I’m getting used to.

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simaudio says

Great thread Taco! I’d love to have a go of that mix when I get the time, might be a while though, I have downloaded the files and it will probably be Xmas by the time I get around to it but hey!

I like the way people have approached the track slightly different, for instance I like what BHMedia did with the piano and what Gareth did with the percussion, I think the piano sounds better sat underneath rather than upfront, it adds a lot more that way, just my opinion of course.

Some acoustic treatment is essential, I think it has probably been one of the best investments I’ve ever made. I hate to bang on about the mopads but they did make a massive difference for my set up and for the sake of £40.00 of your hard earned income I think it’s a no brainer, there is no point in having decent monitors if you don’t isolate them properly. This all depends on what kind of set up you have of course but well placed treatment will never go a miss.

Anyway it’s a good track i think you should upload it when your happy with it.

Great thread :)

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tacoMusic says

Thanks simaudio – funnily enough, I went out and bought some mopad equivalents a couple of days ago! Think I got stung though as they feel a bit flimsy while the mopads look like they’re good quality by the images I’ve seen.

If I were to release this track, I think I’d need to do a longer version and include this one in there for free considering it’s already available for people to download!

By the way, what do you think of these for acoustic treatment of the walls in my studio?

http://www.dolphinmusic.co.uk/product/35735-auralex-d36-dst-roominator-charcoal-.html

Seems pretty cheap, so I have my doubts…

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jhunger says

I took simaudio’s mopad suggestion a while back and I haven’t regretted it. I had my monitors sitting on just some regular auralex blocks but with the mopads you have more control over the angle and it seemed to me that the foam was of a better quality. Certainly you should put at least something under the monitors for isolation.

As for the roominator you linked to, I think those will help a great deal especially if you don’t currently have any treatment. I don’t know if I have exactly the same product, but I have 1×1 blocks of Auralex foam in my studio and I can attest that they get the job done (now I just need a bigger space :P).

Also wanted to chime in and thank everybody who posted mixing tips on this thread – some extremely valuable information here, and I’m looking forward to hearing the various mixes when I get time to sit down and concentrate on them.

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simaudio says

Looks alright to me, not sure if you will need all that, just make sure you go for the proper Auralex stuff and not the cheaper versions available as I’ve heard stories of the foam falling apart and changing colour after a short time.

I used double sided Velcro so that I could move the panels if I wanted, if you use glue then you are kind of stuck to where they go if you know what I mean, pardon the pun! Also you won’t wreck the wall.

You might be better off going for a few of these and see how you get on, but it does depend on your room size of course. I have these ones…600×600

http://www.dv247.com/studio-equipment/universal-acoustics-mercury-wedge-in-charcoal--55354

Maybe add some smaller ones or a bass trap if you still have problems, but you will find just by adding some of these and some mopads that the bass will get a lot tighter instantly. Don’t forget though you will still need a few reflective surfaces to help the highs…. I use a couple of pictures and some blank cds dotted around.

This article is good especially if you like DIY ha-ha, no seriously though, again depending on your room size? making up some panels could be quite helpful and cost effective….great for ceilings.

http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/oct10/articles/studio-sos-1010.htm

@Jhunger…. a bigger room would be a godsend for sure! But on second thoughts I would only fill it up with more rubbish… Lol :bigsmile:

Hope this helps Tacomusic :)

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Wital says

Mixing is a creative process. Every day new knowledge. It’s like a work of the director. There are no rules to create the perfect mix. There are recommendations.

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pinkzebra says

I think this is one of the best threads to come along in a while. Now I have to find some time to see how the different mixes turned out. Interesting stuff! :)

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Allegro120 says

If I have time, I’ll make a mix, but to my taste. :)

Goodbye fellow!

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