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GrizzleFX says

Hey everybody,

So I am about to start my last year of high school, I am probably one of the younger ones here…Anyways I am going to college next august and I have this year to decide where to go. Now my dilemma is what kind of degree I should study for. So right now the two things I am interested in are motion design/video/etc. and engineering. I guess my main question is whether or not getting a degree in video is really worth it, I have learned so much on my own that I have doubts about it. I could minor in video and major in engineering if there’s a school that has that option. Also if anyone knows if my portfolio would get me any scholarships let me know :).

In conclusion I just want to hear your thoughts and tips especially from people who did go to art school or people who considered it.

Thanks.

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FrameWerk says

I got a degree in Film and Digital Media Production, I believe it does help in the long run as I learned a lot and also met lots of experienced people and learned how to be part of larger projects which I think is fairly important.

However, on the other side of the coin, the amount of tutor-ledge available for free online in conjunction with online courses means you can learn a great deal that way as well. I didn’t become involved in motion design until after I had left University where I had mainly studied Art Direction and Editing but now I would class myself as a full-time designer rather than an editor or such, you can never know how things will turn out. The most important thing is that you enjoy what you are doing.

Building a good portfolio is probably a great start like you said, I’m sure it would be useful whichever discipline you decide to go into.

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TyrProductions says

I’d say go for the degree of the field that you have passion in :) I like motion design/video, but I went for Computer Engineering. But now I don’t like the jobs in my field of study. I don’t have interest in it and also the work hours are unbearable. My job is the type of job where I get paid a good salary but the downside is I have to be prepared to work long hours (well, in my country, anyway). I can’t agree with that because I need time to do videos, etc, which is my passion. So, anyway, I’ve chosen not to work in what I studied. Thank God I was offered a job that was related to motion graphics/video and I’m going for it soon :)

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felt_tips Moderator says

I’m probably one of the older ones here and when I went to college, motion graphics didn’t exist. I got into it by being there at the start of the multimedia / internet boom of the mid/late 1990s. I studied fine art at college which I loved, but also had a healthy dose of physics and maths in high school. The perfect combination, actually. Since I left college, I haven’t stopped learning. Manuals, and trial and error at first, tuts, forums, and trial and error later.

Of the two, my first inclination would be to go for engineering. Basically, because I agree that if you have a good eye for design, a good feel for movement and the nous to pick up a program or two, then you know what you need to be a mograph designer. You can’t really learn the first two and the software changes completely every 5 years or so anyway. On the other hand, you should only spend three years of your life studying engineering if you really want to become an engineer.

But if you really want to be a mograph designer, then you should follow that desire. Maybe you should consider doing something mograph related, but broader in scope. Perhaps design, illustration or animation. I think this might eventually give more of a spin / style to your mograph work. For me, I didn’t learn a whole bunch of facts or techniques at art school, but it was a three year basis of personal and visual development, unhindered by necessity, deadlines or clients. It gave me an unshakeable conceptual and visual confidence. I’d do it again.

But take my (and any) advice with a pinch of salt. You’re the best person to know, and in your heart of hearts perhaps you already do. My best advice is: go for what you want to do and don’t pay too much heed to what you ought to do.

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motionpictors says

My best advice is: go for what you want to do and don’t pay too much heed to what you ought to do.
+1 This is what i like to hear.
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iluzie says

+1 : “go for what you want to do and don’t pay too much heed to what you ought to do”

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FluxVFX says

4 year art schools in the US are very very expensive and only getting more so by the minute. I would definitely take that into consideration. I’d take a look at this http://www.payscale.com/college-education-value

I had basically the same experience as Felt when it came to my studies, there was lots of emphasis on fine art, art history, design and lots of room to experiment without deadlines.

Finding a school that has both a comprehensive program in engineering and motion graphics would be pretty cool :)

But of course…. “go for what you want to do and don’t pay too much heed to what you ought to do.”- well said.

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felt_tips Moderator says

I’d take a look at this http://www.payscale.com/college-education-value

I’d be inclined to not look at that link.

I don’t think you can really put a cash value on an education. Job satisfaction, your understanding of the world, the circles you mix in etc are all affected too. At the end of the day, being under-paid and exploited for engaging work that you love and believe in isn’t ideal, but it’s worlds better than being under-paid and exploited on some factory production line or other. :-)

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3dbacks says

today you have (internet) 2 choice’s -pay money for knowledge (someones’s) or use, benefit, profit, learning at home (video tutorials) , 10 years ago must pay for some guy/girl to show you how to do something…...

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InlifeThrill says

Part of my education that was most valuable to me were the drawing lessons I took at primary school. From that point on.. well I studied nothing even close to “art”. No matter what you decide, the saying goes “creative minds have always been known to survive any kind of bad training”.. so that should be encouraging :)

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