30 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 2 years
  • Has sold $100+ on Envato Market
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
+1 more
Interspace says

I’m new too (hello! :) ) and ‘old school/professional’ and agree with the OP. But can see with not much searching around and reading of comments, that some buyers here seem to prefer PS sometimes for things. I found it a bit weird at first too.

My (perhaps wrong) perception is that there is not enough of the ID/Illy print stuff of all types, and that adding to those markets can’t be a bad thing as it gives buyers choice, and ultimately perhaps both packages will catch on a little more. And/or GR will become known for more filetypes – more representative of real-world uses?

The other aspect of this is – who are the buyers? A huge question I guess. If they are fully Adobe’d up designers/professionals, then all file types would be useful/usable.

Perhaps buyers are mostly individuals who want to purchase things on a casual basis and just edit them with whatever they happen to have?

Bring on more vector and ID stuff I say. ;) Healthy to have options and competition.

Interspace

104 posts
  • Made it to the Authors' Hall of Fame
  • Has sold $10,000+ on Envato Market
  • Contributed a free file of the month
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
+8 more
everytuesday says

Thanks for starting a topic on this, I’m really happy that you did. I understand exactly where you’re coming from, because I’m coming from the same place. And being 26 does not make me old school :)

Being a production designer as my full time job, and then freelancing and designing on the side, I absolutely agree with you that illustrator is the best choice quality-wise for print templates. It is the professional industry standard for crispness and compatibility when working with a printer, especially for major projects. I offer almost all of my print templates as ai, eps, and photoshop, because I know many, manyyy of the graphic river community + buyers prefer, or are more comfortable working with photoshop. I use illustrator more on a daily basis now with production work, but my heart will always hold onto photoshop a little tighter, so I get it, and I want to appeal to as many customers as possible, so everyone gets a photoshop file too. Just make sure you don’t just use the exported psd file from illustrator for the zip to be downloaded. Most of the time there are some funky merges and very ugly named layers, so just be sure to tidy it up a bit. Good luck + welcome to the river!

11 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 3 years
  • Has collected 10+ items on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
spoocobra says



My opinion is whatever’s designed in Photoshop using typography is probably not going to be a well thought project in terms of layout and design rules, grids etc. Photoshop is simply not made for that. But if the client wants to edit their business card in PS and go to an offset printing house and get the weird looks, that’s their right… :)

You sound SO oldschool.

Get out of your bubble mate, you got it all wrong.

I print biz cards with many effects and they come out perfectly.

And TBH , simple vector biz card style just won’t sell that good and IMO doesn’t catch the eye at all.

It’s not really an “old school” thing to be professional, just the reality of printing in a certain environment. I don’t know if you went to a design school or not, but in the professional world : effects = superficial = lack of pure creativity.

Photoshop can’t handle PMS . Which for business cards and stationnery a big problem, especially if you print pantones on creative paper stocks.

If you design something in Photoshop, when you go to the printer, they’ll raster your work, the end result is CMYK printing, not spot colors. Which means much lower quality. Again, if you have the eye for that kind of detail, the difference is huge.

But I totally understand the marketplace now, thanks for all the comments. Basicly: The client will buy catchy graphics and colors on the marketplace and can only judge by watching the preview images, hence the huge amount of effects used on the previews, even if they don’t end up on prints. Looks good on screen and that’s what matters, probably not when offset printed in PMS but it doesn’t matter because the client doesn’t care or know what it is.

The difference I see between working with clients or selling on the marketplace is that working with clients, you usually follow the project from start to finish, you can’t BS them with monitor quality images full of effects. They want to see the real thing, the quality (at least my clients does). On the marketplace it’s different since the clients buys an almost ready to print item for a few $ and he’s then responsible for what happens next when he goes to the printer.

It’s a matter of thought and I wonder which direction I should go, as far as creating new material for the marketplace. Let’s share ideas :)

I totally disagree with you. As someone who has been doing g.d/d.t.p 16+ years for a printing company you sound ignorant of the printing world. Photoshop can’t handle PMS ? I print all types of psd files both 4/c and up to 8/c (4/c process + 4 spot colors) with no problem. We’ve even done spot pms on top of the 4/c process. I even have a client that supplies native .psd files both 4/c and spot and they match the G7 Certified proofs they supply.

So please don’t say that it can be done, when in reality it can be done.

As for the thread topic I feel that the reason photoshop is the most used app is because most people are somewhat familiar with it by one means or another. (MS Paint, etc…) and that it isn’t that hard to figure out the basics of it. I agree with you on Illu and Indesign for type and the rest and wish more authors would use it but eh what can you do.

742 posts
  • Has referred 1+ members
  • Has sold $10,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has been a beta tester for an Envato feature
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
+7 more
EladChai says



My opinion is whatever’s designed in Photoshop using typography is probably not going to be a well thought project in terms of layout and design rules, grids etc. Photoshop is simply not made for that. But if the client wants to edit their business card in PS and go to an offset printing house and get the weird looks, that’s their right… :)

You sound SO oldschool.

Get out of your bubble mate, you got it all wrong.

I print biz cards with many effects and they come out perfectly.

And TBH , simple vector biz card style just won’t sell that good and IMO doesn’t catch the eye at all.

It’s not really an “old school” thing to be professional, just the reality of printing in a certain environment. I don’t know if you went to a design school or not, but in the professional world : effects = superficial = lack of pure creativity.

Photoshop can’t handle PMS . Which for business cards and stationnery a big problem, especially if you print pantones on creative paper stocks.

If you design something in Photoshop, when you go to the printer, they’ll raster your work, the end result is CMYK printing, not spot colors. Which means much lower quality. Again, if you have the eye for that kind of detail, the difference is huge.

But I totally understand the marketplace now, thanks for all the comments. Basicly: The client will buy catchy graphics and colors on the marketplace and can only judge by watching the preview images, hence the huge amount of effects used on the previews, even if they don’t end up on prints. Looks good on screen and that’s what matters, probably not when offset printed in PMS but it doesn’t matter because the client doesn’t care or know what it is.

The difference I see between working with clients or selling on the marketplace is that working with clients, you usually follow the project from start to finish, you can’t BS them with monitor quality images full of effects. They want to see the real thing, the quality (at least my clients does). On the marketplace it’s different since the clients buys an almost ready to print item for a few $ and he’s then responsible for what happens next when he goes to the printer.

It’s a matter of thought and I wonder which direction I should go, as far as creating new material for the marketplace. Let’s share ideas :)

Take a look at some of my business cards to understand why I can’t use illustrator to make them. It’s just impossible. Illustrator limits your design to a vector style look and like mentioned above ^ you can print psd’s with no problem at all.

“but in the professional world : effects = superficial = lack of pure creativity.”

\\

69 posts
  • Has referred 1+ members
  • Has sold $10,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has been a beta tester for an Envato feature
  • Has collected 50+ items on Envato Market
+2 more
Emil_J says

I’d still like to see how you manage spot inks in photoshop.

15 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 2 years
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
minimaldesign says

Yes Emil, I have no idea how one could manage pantone spot in PS :)

11 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 3 years
  • Has collected 10+ items on Envato Market
  • Located in United States
spoocobra says

I’d still like to see how you manage spot inks in photoshop.
http://26.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_krogb3t3W51qzkrkao1_400.gif

What would you like to know?

94 posts
  • Has referred 1+ members
  • Has sold $10,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has been a beta tester for an Envato feature
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
+3 more
NeWave says

I had some problems with spot colors on photoshop some time ago. I think it was 1996 and the photoshop version was 4.0, after some 16 minutes of studying I figured it out…

:) I don’t want to offend anyone but there are things that can be done even though you haven’t heard of them. Take 5 minutes of google work or 5 minutes of typing misinformation that other people actually read as facts…

http://lmgtfy.com/?q=photoshop+spot+color

cheers all! :)

69 posts
  • Has referred 1+ members
  • Has sold $10,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has been a beta tester for an Envato feature
  • Has collected 50+ items on Envato Market
+2 more
Emil_J says

...weight on the word “manage”. Sure you can add hundreds of inks to a bitmap. Actually, you don’t need any software at all, just get few spray cans and patterns, tada. You can saw with hammer, too. What’s appropriate? Cut the nitpicking. For avarage John Doe it doesn’t matter but for professional objectives I warmly suggest familiarizing into the subject, it might teach one a lot.

94 posts
  • Has referred 1+ members
  • Has sold $10,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has been a beta tester for an Envato feature
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
+3 more
NeWave says

I’d still like to understand what you mean by “manage spot inks” in photoshop. I war my suggest you doing that google search. it might teach you a lot.

by
by
by
by
by
by