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hansv says

As Motionreactor and Arquitectofstyles said, DPI is not a resolution as in digital format. DPI is how an image is going to be printed on a paper (paper.. or whatever you print on).

I found this article which should help you out, it actually talks about the confussion of some when they talk about DPI . It is called “Myth of the DPI ”

http://www.rideau-info.com/photos/mythdpi.html

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thomas07 says

You guys doesnt read what i am saying, the question was asked clearly by GeertDD and i answered it simply. You need to read the question…not making speculations about resolution vs dpi…we all know what is resolution and what is dpi. And yes, i second it again, an 300 dpi image is definitely more worth than a file at 72dpi…here the question is asked by a designer that plan to produce textures…textures most often here on GR are purchaised to be used as website background or web use. The buyer have the option to adjust the image resolution to web/screen display resolution. The advantage comes in action here as its always better to resize image from high-res to low-res as to resize an image from low-res to high-res. Here we have 2 different ways of resizing an image:

—resize image from 300 to 72 dpi (will output better quality)

—resize image from 72 to 300 dpi (your resized image will get pixelated)

While you change the resolution of an image, the “image size” is getting also resized. Now why the question was asked here, i assume is coz of the reasons above. Lest say you produce all of your textures in 72 dpi, but the buyer is planing to use the texture for print. Here the buyer will need to change the image resolution from 72 to 300 dpi in order to meet the print requirements and standards. Increasing the amound of resolution to 300 dpi, will also change the pixels amound of the image size (example, the 3000×2000 pixels will automaticaly increase to 12500×8334 or something like that). Now the buyer probably will adjust the pixels back to 3000×2000…this will not compress the image quality back.

The reason why is better to start with a file at 300 dpi is this, resizing an image that is created at 300 dpi is always better than resining an image created at 72 dpi…this was the question asked and the answer is clear.

I dont collect that info on google or read some articles to educate my self as oposite to some others, i do apply them for about 12 years and have experiences in this industry (print and web media)...otherwise all i know, practiced and learned must be really wrong. For instance, someone asked a question and someone answered…i am not going to make now another “conflict” from this thread (as i see some guys on here very much want me to do that). You can prefere to go with 72 dpi resolution for your textures, but i dont…so this is the reason why mostly i do them at 300 dpi.

Here i am going to second Motioncreator (but including hem/her self into this words):

Really if you are confused about these issues I would highly recommend you read up about them. It is critical to the professionalism of your status as an Author.

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Motionreactor says
Lest say you produce all of your textures in 72 dpi, but the buyer is planing to use the texture for print. Here the buyer will need to change the image resolution from 72 to 300 dpi in order to meet the print requirements and standards. Increasing the amound of resolution to 300 dpi, will also change the pixels amound of the image size (example, the 3000×2000 pixels will automaticaly increase to 12500×8334 or something like that)

This is simply not true.

Increasing or decreasing the DPI does not change the resolution, the actual pixel dimensions do not change. You can have a 1000×1000 pixel resolution at both 72 DPI or at 300 DPI and it will still be the same resolution of 1000×1000 pixels. It will of course print at a different scale if it is set to 300 DPI it will print out very small and look crisp and detailed, if it is set to 72 DPI it will print out bigger but less detailed. The actual number of pixels will not have changed just because the DPI has, it will still be a 1000×100 pixel image.

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GeertDD says

With all respect, thomas07, after reading the very informative article hansv linked to above, I think you’ve got it wrong.

Increasing the amound of resolution to 300 dpi, will also change the pixels amound of the image size (example, the 3000×2000 pixels will automaticaly increase to 12500×8334 or something like that).

Dpi and resolution are two different things, and changing one should not influence the other. I’m going to quote the article because I can’t explain it any better:

The Horrible DPI Mistake Here’s the scenario – a print shop/graphics designer/magazine asks a client for a photo at 300 dpi. They wish to print it out at 5” x 7”. The client already has a beautiful digital photo with pixel dimensions of 2048×1536. The client notices that the photo editing software is showing that the photo is set to 72 dpi. So, following orders, the client types in 300 to reset the dpi to 300. In doing so the image is resampled and is enlarged over 4 times to pixel dimensions of 8533×6400. The client sends this enlarged 300 dpi photo. The print shop/graphics designer/magazine reject it (too grainy, too colour blotched). The client is crushed. The sad thing is that the client already had the perfect photo (2048×1536 @ 72 dpi) which would have been beautifully printed at 5” x 7” (at 292.6 PPI ). [...]

http://www.rideau-info.com/photos/mythdpi.html

Edit: Motionreactor beat me to it. Anyway, good to see we’re on the same page.

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thomas07 says

alright, i give it up…do it as you feel is right, i only specified how i am doing it and untill now (in this 12 years) no one of my customers come to me complaining their image has been printed at bad quality. Why many of my textures are at 300?...very simple, to be able to offer both…print files and web files. A web file output can be created from an 300 dpi image…but you cant create really good quality image for print from 72 dpi file.

The example at this thread we have is just to show you how you schould create your image/texture…go ahead an do them at 72 dpi if you feel your customer wont come back and ask for their money to be returned as the item they purchaised didnt pritn well. However, idealy you specify in your description the image/texture is not for print purposes. From other side think a little and decide, what is better…to have an image that is at print quality (which the client can resize down to web format 72 dpi and use also for web) or have an item to offer that is only for web?..this are my last 2 c.

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Motionreactor says
A web file output can be created from an 300 dpi image…but you cant create really good quality image for print from 72 dpi file.

Yes you can create a 300dpi image from a 72dpi image without resizing any pixels. Of course the actual print size (scale if you like) will be different, but the actual resolution (number of pixels) does not have to change.

If I create an image at 1000×1000 pixels, then this image can be used for both screen/web and for print. Granted it won’t be very big when printed at 300dpi, but it is still the same ‘resolution’ (number of pixels) as the 72dpi image used as a web background.

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Motionreactor says

To answer the original question… sorry for the sidetrack.

As big as possible is what you should aim for when designing a background, so that it can be used for both web and print. Look at what people are already doing and use that as a benchmark, especially the items that sell best.

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thomas07 says
To answer the original question… sorry for the sidetrack. As big as possible is what you should aim for when designing a background, so that it can be used for both web and print. Look at what people are already doing and use that as a benchmark, especially the items that sell best.

That was what i am saying since my 1st post on this thread…glad you got it at the end :D …additionaly, create it at 300 dpi, which will increase the chance of the file been purchaised.

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Motionreactor says

I always had it ;)

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