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Tamixes says

Hello fellow designers!

I’d like to design some backgrounds but I’m undecided at what size to design for. What size do you design for when you do a background texture? Do you design it for both print and web or do you design it just for web? Any advice is much appreciated.

Thanks!

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GeertDD says

Good question. Larger is always better, right? However, at some point the element of file size comes into play. I’ve done some backgrounds in 4000×3000, but my latest digital noise pack is ‘only’ 2000×1500 (because it contains 10 different noise layers).

Anyway, I would advice not to go below 2000px width and maintain an aspect ration of 4:3 or 16:9.

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thomas07 says

most of my backgrounds are in 3000×2000 dpi and for print. I think this is an good dimension since designers can buy and resize them down to their needs if they are planing to use as website background. This way the file is compitable to be used forboth, print and web needs.

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GeertDD says
most of my backgrounds are in 3000×2000 dpi and for print.

Could you fix that sentence? I’m interested in what you want to say about dpi, but currently it makes no sense. Thanks.

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thomas07 says

yeah sory…dimensions i mostly use is 3000×2000pixels and i mostly make sure the image quality is high like at 300 dpi resolution.

For sure you may prefere to produce backgrounds only for web use, but then i suggest you have your image dimensions large as possible. If you consider, most web designers will look for 1400 pixels minimum widht, your backgrounds schould support this

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Tamixes says

Thanks, I’ll try a 4:3 ratio at a high res and I’ll try some specifically for web (should I do it only at 72dpi or try a higher res?) at a different ratio. I’m still finding my feet here on GR, so I’ll see which items sell better.

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GeertDD says

I may want to educate myself again on dpi settings, but I thought it didn’t really matter when you sell multi-purpose files.

If your file is 3000×2000 pixels. It will always be that amount of pixels (60 thousand) regardless of dpi. And thus filesize (talking bytes here) will be the same for that file on 72dpi or 300dpi. The 300dpi file will only print at a smaller size (and be sharper too, of course). Since you can easily change the dpi setting via “Image Size” in Photoshop, I don’t see why a 3000×2000 file at 300dpi would be worth more than a 3000×2000 file at 72dpi.

Please tell me where my reasoning is flawed, if it is. I find this stuff quite confusing, yet interesting.

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thomas07 says

The difference is big, and this comes when you resize the file in photoshop “Image Size”. Resizing a file that is at 300 dpi is always better as resizing a file that is at 72 dpi…simply for the quality that will output at the end. Idealy, you always start with an document that have 300 dpi resolution when creating textures or patterns. A file created at 300 dpi is always better compressed for maximum image quality and this is the reason why 3000×2000 file at 300dpi is more worth than a 3000×2000 file at 72dpi.

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Motionreactor says

Sorry thomas07 but you are actually wrong.

I’m super surprised there is any confusion here regarding Resolution vs DPI .

GeertDD is absolutely correct. 3000×2000 pixels is the same resolution whether it is 300dpi or 72dpi. DPI refers to the number of pixels per inch when printed not the physical number of pixels and therefore actual resolution (image fidelity).

Really if you are confused about these issues I would highly recommend you read up about them. It is critical to the professionalism of your status as an Author.

arquitectostyles
arquitectostyles Recent Posts Threads Started
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arquitectostyles says
Sorry thomas07 but you are actually wrong.

+1 motionreactor

And yes, agreed. Im sure you guys can find some in depth explanations on google perhaps

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