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reubenchng says

oh well. i just put plug ins and effects without a certain rule, my computer starts lagging then i know its time to upload that on audiojungle. lol.

but really, simple is more. ;)

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SoundFix says

oh well. i just put plug ins and effects without a certain rule, my computer starts lagging then i know its time to upload that on audiojungle. lol. but really, simple is more. ;)

Yeah that’s terrible advice to just use as many as possible haha, apart from the simple is more, that’s good advice. Don’t apply things unless you understand what they are doing. When I started trying to mix I just eq’d everything and it ruined my mixes. Really listen carefully, test compression and EQ and listen for the differences it makes to see if you really need to. That’s my advice :)

Sam

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jhunger says

Take this for what it’s worth because I’m a musician/songwriter first who has picked up recording/mixing/mastering by necessity. I can’t give an expert’s opinion but I can tell you what has gotten me from point A (me, 3 years ago) to point B (present day me).

I agree with some of the other posts in that I’m a firm believer in capturing the source as well as possible and doing as little as possible in the mix. For acoustic stringed instruments choosing an appropriate mic/preamp is important, for instance I’ve found that there are mics that work very well on a nylon string but are entirely inappropriate for my steel string. Also spending time trying different mic positions is important. I’m continually exploring better pairings and positionings because I always feel my sound can be better. I nearly always EQ guitar in the mix, but try to keep it to a hi-pass to cut out muddy bass and a little cut in the mids.

I also agree with the less is more approach. If I get to the point where I’m trying to layer yet another instrument over a composition in an attempt to make it sound good that usually means that the composition is not strong to begin with. The best tracks I have make use of a few key instruments.

Also, for me upgrading equipment to the best I can afford has been very important. Don’t get me wrong – I’ve heard great performances and mixes done with sub par equipment. It can be done, but, especially if you’re learning on the job like I am, having good tools is a big help. Two of the most eye opening upgrades I’ve made in the last few years is moving from a pair of TubePRE preamps to an RNP , and upgrading my monitors a year or so back. It’s not always the most expensive tools either – case in point is that the best mic I’ve found for my steel string to date is a modded Oktava MK012 (from Oktavamod) – half the price of a Neumann KM184 but (to my ears) sooo much better for the application.

Oh yeah, I guess the performance is important too :). For acoustic instruments I try to, as much as possible, record everything in a single take so I don’t have to punch in and out or edit the WAV take later on. Sometimes I do fixup, but too much of this and the track suffers in my opinion.

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HarryAndre says

Gee! I didn’t recieve e-mails for all these posts and I just thought that there was nothing new here! I got back from my vacation about 2 weeks ago and this is the first time I check audiojungle since then. I decided to check the forum and noticed that there were 12 replies at my post!

So, thanks a lot to everyone! I read some very nice stuff. I’ll take a better look tomorrow cause it’s almost 5 am here and I need some sleep. That means I’ll probably have some new questions…! Again, thanks for your suggestions! :)

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joshhunsaker says

oh well. i just put plug ins and effects without a certain rule, my computer starts lagging then i know its time to upload that on audiojungle. lol. but really, simple is more. ;)

LOL !!!!! awesome, soooo funny :D

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HarryAndre says

AAAAAAAAAAnd here I am… Having internet connection problems sucks but having made your 2nd sale when you manage to get back online totally makes up for it!!! :D Btw, there’s not a way to see who has bought an item of yours, is there?

Anyways, great tips guys, and some awesome articles! I’ve already started experimenting. The posts about recording where kind of “too much” for me, since I do everything on the pc, but I’ve read some articles and from my personal experience too it’s clear to me that it’s vital to have some live instruments, but until I have the musicians (and some money to give for their job) I’ll have to stick to what I can do on my own. I always felt that EQ is very important and I’m really happy about the posts you made. So, thanks a lot! I hope my upcoming stuff are much better. And I’ll have you to thank for that. :)

PatrickAThompson
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PatrickAThompson says

1. Study – Study mixes and productions from whatever style(s) that’s applicable to what you do. For example, if it’s cinematic, then listen listen and listen even more to great cinematic productions and study it. Make it your own as well. If you are into pop, study different pop styles and mixes!

2. Study some More – I put this in another thread but I’ve been following grammy award winning mix engineer on YouTube for this whole year. http://www.youtube.com/user/PensadosPlace. This has literally helped me transform my mixes, the way i mix, and helped me learn a lot in a small amount of time. And it’s free :)

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This is a wild guess, but I feel like most of us are musicians first – and recording engineers second…

Education! Education! Education! Read. Study. Learn. Lather, rinse, repeat. And when you think you know everything there is to know - Read, study, and learn.

These days, anyone with a $5 midi keyboard from a pawn shop and a decent computer can create ‘music’. And I honestly think that’s a good thing!!... The ones who will be successful, however, are the musicians who invest in their education to further their skills… Spend time studying trends.. Watch tutorials… Join\read\and participate in the forums for the products you use. Buy the hard copy of famous classical works and study the orchestration and how the instruments work together.

“But Patrick!! I do hip-hop!” Doesn’t matter… I’d wager that 90% of modern commercial (sellable) music successfully uses the same musical principles they did for most classical pieces.

But here’s the thing. Someone can have the coolest\most expensive rig in the world, but if they don’t know how to use it, it is worthless. And using it properly goes well beyond just making it sound ‘good’... WHY does a track sound good? WHY does it sound muddy? Knowing the basics will exponentially increase your production skills…

There is so much info available out there just waiting to be absorbed by fresh talent. Make use of it! Keep. Learning.

Best of luck!!

Stuck_in_the_Basement
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Stuck_in_the_Basement Envato team says

This is a wild guess, but I feel like most of us are musicians first – and recording engineers second…

Education! Education! Education! Read. Study. Learn. Lather, rinse, repeat. And when you think you know everything there is to know - Read, study, and learn.

These days, anyone with a $5 midi keyboard from a pawn shop and a decent computer can create ‘music’. And I honestly think that’s a good thing!!... The ones who will be successful, however, are the musicians who invest in their education to further their skills… Spend time studying trends.. Watch tutorials… Join\read\and participate in the forums for the products you use. Buy the hard copy of famous classical works and study the orchestration and how the instruments work together.

“But Patrick!! I do hip-hop!” Doesn’t matter… I’d wager that 90% of modern commercial (sellable) music successfully uses the same musical principles they did for most classical pieces.

But here’s the thing. Someone can have the coolest\most expensive rig in the world, but if they don’t know how to use it, it is worthless. And using it properly goes well beyond just making it sound ‘good’... WHY does a track sound good? WHY does it sound muddy? Knowing the basics will exponentially increase your production skills…

There is so much info available out there just waiting to be absorbed by fresh talent. Make use of it! Keep. Learning.

Best of luck!!

Nicely put Patrick. I would add that not only you need to constantly study, but also practice a lot, more like you would do with an instrument.
When I started uploading here a few months ago, I had not produced anything in a while. I definitely felt “rusty”. The mixing and mastering of my first item took forever.
Now that I work on new tracks on a more regular basis, it comes much easier.

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