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NeutrinoTeam says

Hi all,

I need an advice here. I have a client on an ongoing pretty large project. Unfortunately this project seems to go nowhere. It’s been about 8 months now and we are still on the homepage design. Although it’s looking great, this client seems to have difficults to make his own decisions. The designer has quit already after too many changes he asked, and the long time it took him to give a feedback for each sketch. So… what should I do ?

I must say that if I quit or cancel the project I need to pay back everything, after doing so much work this can’t be the answer. You will probably think that the website is poor and that’s why it takes so much time. Well it’s not. It looks really good, and even the client admits he loves the design.

Thanks for any advice in advance

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Mocarg Volunteer moderator says

8 months?! Well did you sign a contract?

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NeutrinoTeam says

Yes of course we did… The contract says what’s our responsibility for time schedule and not his, and of course we are not the problem here… so the contract doesn’t gives us any power to stop this project.

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Skywarrior says

For my experience you should give the client a deadline. Just tell him/her that she needs to make a decision by next week or you wont be able to continue with the project.

Regarding paying back everything… Well that makes no sense. You worked all this time, just give her the files you have done and thats it. If you pay her back it would be like going to a restaurant, asking for a 4 dishes course and when you finish everything saying “Sorry I didn’t like it, bye” and not paying.

Hope that helps.

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contrastblack Envato team says

Hi NeutrinoTeam,

for starters, my personal reply would be :

It all comes down to the contract that you have in place. The contract is somewhat both the gate to heaven and the landslide to hell for a freelancer. So depending on how carefully you, the designer, and any other team member working on this project, wrote the initial agreement, you can either be bound to pay back, or even ask for more money depending on who infringed the initial clauses. Also, usually a contract should include a delivery deadline and mentions for both parties regarding what happens and who pays what in case those deadlines are not respected by either the client or the freelancer.

So, short reply, there’s no way out, if the contract states this, you need to pay up and go on your way (painful as it may be, it could actually prove more productive than going for another 8 months)

Hope this helps in some way :)

Kind regards, CB.

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NeutrinoTeam says

if the contract states this, you need to pay up and go on your way (painful as it may be, it could actually prove more productive than going for another 8 months)

In a way I agree, but I think that’s not fair. For example, for non-freelance people who go to work and the boss treat them like @$&! . They can quit and it can be considered as if thery were fired, since they can’t stand it anymore. And I think this is the situation here.

But what I really thought to do is what @skywarrior said – give a deadline. I think this is fair. Even a deadline of two month, and what we make in these two months are yours (the client) what not – not.

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contrastblack Envato team says

So, tell me more about how Freelancing was an easy task :D

Seriously though, as hard as it is, it all comes down to the contract. Best case scenario you can present a “draft” outlining a deadline and terms on which you part from the project should it not be completed by then, and hope to get a signature so you are in the clear (but this will most likely still involve some sacrifice on your part as well).

Good luck with it :)

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phpdude says

Yes of course we did… The contract says what’s our responsibility for time schedule and not his, and of course we are not the problem here… so the contract doesn’t gives us any power to stop this project.

Forgive me if I misunderstand you, but does the contract say it’s your responsibility for the time schedule? If so, you should enforce deadlines like say to them “The deadline for final sign off of the designs are [2 weeks time], as per our contract I am in charge of deadlines, so if you do not meet this deadline you will be breaking our contract and thus it will be canceled and I will not be liable for returning any funds you already sent” and if they fail THEY broke the contract, and you wouldn’t be liable to pay back any money.

By all means, this is my interpretation of what you said. Please don’t do anything without consulting some kind of legal advice locally. Is there any free services available to you where you are that can help clarify anything?

I agree with what @contractsaid, it may be painful to break out of the contract, but IF it frees up your time and results in you making more money, simply calculate how long it would be that the extra you earn would pay off what you lost. If you can live with that loss, and time it takes to re-earn, then maybe it would be best to end the contract.

Just some thoughts of mine here, but I really do suggest you get some free (or cost effective) legal advice locally.

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Australia says

l would read your contract. Seems to me you may be your own worse enemy.

Your obviously being reimbursed, but getting nowhere slowly.

Most contracts work on a basis of Time is of the essence. You cannot be locked in “in perpetuity”

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NeutrinoTeam says

Thanks all for your comments and support.

I will consult a family relative of mine of the legal perspective. And I think I’ve learned somthing here about the contract (altough I was very happy with it till now).

Right now I think I will try to put a deadline + new sub-contract that clarify “what if” and new schedule.

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