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Tamixes says

Any Coders out there who’ve collaborated with a Designer on a web project will know that we each have out own strengths and weaknesses. As a Designer, I’d rather focus on what I do well then drop my productivity by trying to code.

So for future reference I’d like the perspective of coders regarding the following questions

What skill do you wish Designers were taught (or knew) that would have made the project more bearable/ enjoyable/ profitable/ successful?

Or what basic code principles do you wish Designers knew?

Thanks!

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Emroni says

Something that annoys most of us is when a designer makes a small change, that actually affects the entire project. Sometimes, we need to recode a whole lot to achieve a small thing. Not always though, but it happens a lot. So what you could do is try to create what you want, and then leave it alone, dont make changes after. Only when you really have to, for example when the developer says he/she cant do it.

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Tamixes says

Thanks Emroni,

I suppose that stems from a designer being unaware of what they’re actually asking for – that the simple ‘tweak’ is not so simple.

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pixelnourish says

To be honest, I don’t find it a problem to convey issues I have with a designer. I work as a front-end developer, in a design agency. If I have a problem with a design from a coding perspective, I will sit down with the designer and talk about how we can change it to make it easier, but still look right.

I guess I’m probably not the best person to ask, as I am a designer and coder myself. But as long as you are willing to be open in dialogue as well as open to the fact your design just may not work then I don’t see any problem.

Oh, and if you want rounded corners in IE, just accept that it won’t happen without a lot of fiddling ;)

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Tooschee says
Something that annoys most of us is when a designer makes a small change, that actually affects the entire project. Sometimes, we need to recode a whole lot to achieve a small thing.

Sorry but i disagree, I design and code , and working with one more coder, and if You need to recode a lot, juz because a designer changed for example a width from 500px to 505px and the whole site got messed up, means that Your code isn’t so good as You think :) ( I’m not trying to be mean, just trying to show, that code should be well though, everyone can do a structure, that collapses if one item got changed. True coding starts when you can change every single block and it still behave the same way )

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Emroni says

^ Hehe, of course I dont mean changes that small :P I know how to code well, thats not the issue.

The problem is things like having a submenu at the top of the page, sliding out from underneath the main menu. The whole site is then aligned according to the y position of the submenu that might pop up. When the designer than says, well, I think we should place it at the left hand side instead, you have yourself a problem. Since everything is aligned with the top, your website will get screwed up since every page will be shown off screen, below the submenu. You will have to redo some bits to make it work again, depending how you built the pages.

See, with some projects I had to make every page independent from the rest of the site, so each page has its resize function inside its own code. When the main look is changed, I would need to change all of the pages (modules in this case) resize functions, which takes time.

Small things like changing color or size isnt usually an issue, since I code it so that it dynamically looks for widths and heights or colors. Changing those will affect the looks of the site, but the code can handle it no problemo.

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Reaper-Media says
Oh, and if you want rounded corners in IE, just accept that it won’t happen without a lot of fiddling ;)

BEST JS SCRIPT EVER !!!

http://www.curvycorners.net/

Picks up the moz-runded-corners and webkit-rounded-corners from the css, so all you need is one line of code :)

The only problem occurs when the divs get resized, then you have to call a re-draw function, which is still not a biggie.

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Motionreactor says

You have two options:

  1. Learn to design and code. Understanding both contexts leads to unified form and function.
  2. Or… Communicate. Constantly and openly. Shared understanding means better results for everyone.
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Tamixes says

2

I’m a great believer in open communication – assumptions from either side can often lead to a soured relationship.

The main reason why I’m asking this question is that I’ve been given the opportunity to teach web design (from a designer perspective) and and I don’t want to make the mistake of overlooking some obvious points that will benefit my students.

If you’re interested you can take a look at a mind map (still a work in progress and there are some errors in it) I posted on my blog http://tinyurl.com/ybxb6kc

I’ve attempted to get an overall view of web (it’s so vast that I have another 3 mind maps that focus on areas like ‘The Design Brief’, ‘The Web Workflow’ from a designer perspective, and a more ‘Basic Overview of Web Design’ as the one on my blog excludes SEO )

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dexterous says
If you’re interested you can take a look at a mind map (still a work in progress and there are some errors in it) I posted on my blog http://tinyurl.com/ybxb6kc

This looks quite detailed, but is there a way to see the bigger view of the image? Its not readable in the blog post.

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