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PhilLarson
says

So… my brother is acting out in LA and today was featured on “Supreme Justice with Judge Karen.” Yes… those judge shows are not real (as well as Jerry Springer and the like…). All of the people are actors on those shows.

Anyway, wouldn’t you know it that my ear caught the end of one of the commercials during this show. The commercial ended and it hit me… “THAT WAS MY SONG, ‘Sentimental Moods!’ ...during a commercial break of a show that my brother was featured on. Weird stuff, no doubt!

However, I cannot for the life of me remember what the commercial was about and that song has never had an extended license purchase… which is also disconcerting…

Thought it was an incredible coincidence and that you guys might find it interesting to know… I am super curious on finding this commercial (and wondering if one could sue for the extended license not being purchased…).

Anyway, thanks for letting me share!

Phil

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PremiumTunes
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Wow, that’s a pretty strange but cool occurrence, Phil! Not sure how they could use your song in that capacity though. I’d continue digging if I were you.

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Blinn
says

So… my brother is acting out in LA and today was featured on “Supreme Justice with Judge Karen.” Yes… those judge shows are not real (as well as Jerry Springer and the like…). All of the people are actors on those shows.

Anyway, wouldn’t you know it that my ear caught the end of one of the commercials during this show. The commercial ended and it hit me… “THAT WAS MY SONG, ‘Sentimental Moods!’ ...during a commercial break of a show that my brother was featured on. Weird stuff, no doubt!

However, I cannot for the life of me remember what the commercial was about and that song has never had an extended license purchase… which is also disconcerting…

Thought it was an incredible coincidence and that you guys might find it interesting to know… I am super curious on finding this commercial (and wondering if one could sue for the extended license not being purchased…).

Anyway, thanks for letting me share!

Phil

This is precisely why I never buy anything on Envato. I’d probably end up violating something without even knowing.

In fact this is a great subject for Envato’s next business meeting or something. Wouldn’t hurt to consider adding more licensing options to the items in the marketplace, particularly something like an “Infinite” License where if someone buys an item under an Infinite Licence, they can use it as many times as they please with the peace of mind that what they buy is what they keep.

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WillBedford
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Would an ad require an extended licence, since the end product (the ad itself) isn’t being sold?

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Art-of-Sound
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Would an ad require an extended licence, since the end product (the ad itself) isn’t being sold?

The answer is in the question, commercials are free to watch, so no extended license is required for a commercial.

wondering if one could sue for the extended license not being purchased

If the project requires the extended license but a regular license was purchased, you can sue for the loss of profit, which in your case would be $68. The game’s not worth the candle.

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Lmz
says

The answer is in the question, commercials are free to watch, so no extended license is required for a commercial.

From my understanding, commercials are (generally) created by an ad agency (or video production service) for a company wanting an advertisement. The company hires them to deliver a completed spot, or ‘work’, (including the proper license for the music used) to be broadcast on tv/radio.

So that being the case, music used in an ad (bought be the ad agency/ video service) is being sold as part of a finished product to the company so an extended license would be needed.

If the company is producing the spot itself then a regular license would work (I think) since the created spot wouldn’t ever be ‘sold’ for profit.

Or maybe I’m missing something?

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brandonamatias
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Sorry for the lack of compensation, Phil! But it’s awesome that your music was used!

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Art-of-Sound
says
From my understanding, commercials are (generally) created by an ad agency (or video production service) for a company wanting an advertisement. The company hires them to deliver a completed spot, or ‘work’, (including the proper license for the music used) to be broadcast on tv/radio.

So that being the case, music used in an ad (bought be the ad agency/ video service) is being sold as part of a finished product to the company so an extended license would be needed.

From the terms of the regular license: “You are licensed to use the Item to create one single End Product for yourself or for one client (a “single application”), and the End Product can be distributed for Free.

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Lmz
says

From my understanding, commercials are (generally) created by an ad agency (or video production service) for a company wanting an advertisement. The company hires them to deliver a completed spot, or ‘work’, (including the proper license for the music used) to be broadcast on tv/radio.

So that being the case, music used in an ad (bought be the ad agency/ video service) is being sold as part of a finished product to the company so an extended license would be needed.

From the terms of the regular license: “You are licensed to use the Item to create one single End Product for yourself or for one client (a “single application”), and the End Product can be distributed for Free.

Thanks for the clarification!

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MeGustaMusic
says

That is both great and bad! Nice to listen your music on TV but a good moment to analyze how Extended licences works. I ll stay tune to this thread.

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