Posts by tacoMusic

490 posts
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tacoMusic says

Hi,

I thought I’d share an interesting email from another library I’m involved with that has introduced a new technology called LicenseID that digitally fingerprints all their music (I’ve removed the library name). It says:

What does this mean for our Artists? Whenever your music is licensed from our library, LicenseID automatically embeds an inaudible tag onto the track that contains your license information which helps us more easily identify the correct use of your copyrights.

What does that mean for our Clients? LID also benefits the licensees by immediately giving them information that enables them to prove license compliance.

In a nutshell:

  • Whenever your music is licensed from us, it has a LID on it.
  • LID allows clients to prove they have a license and makes it easier to identify when there is a copyright violation.
  • This service and copyright protection is only available through our library.

Interesting stuff…

490 posts
  • Referred between 50 and 99 users
  • Bought between 1 and 9 items
  • Sold between 10 000 and 50 000 dollars
  • United Kingdom
  • Has been a member for 5-6 years
tacoMusic says

The search changes have rebalanced what gets exposed, and when new items move up for popular search terms, other items have to move down. Not everything can be in 1st place forever. I can understand that this sucks if you’ve been getting consistent good sales for a while off an existing body of work, and suddenly it changes. Unfortunately, the scales were tipped too far favouring a smaller group of authors for too long, and it hurts a bit when we need to rebalance it.

Hi madlep,

I’m trying to get my head around the best strategy for authors now in terms of keeping sales consistent. Over at AJ we’ve always been told that success on the marketplaces is about treating it as a ‘marathon’ rather than a ‘sprint’ and therefore investing a lot of time in the quality of items over churning them out regularly.

If items have a shelf-life / honeymoon period during which they have exposure and a chance to sell, yet don’t sell for one reason or another (not appearing in search results is a pretty important one), then it sounds like the model has now moved to one where regular uploading AND deleting of older tracks is the only way to keep sales consistent.

I know you can’t give away inside secrets on how to be successful here as it could lead to abuse of the system, but trying to survive off sales here is becoming increasingly difficult since the end of last year, so some basic advice on how to stay afloat would be greatly appreciated by a lot of us I think. Maybe a new sticky thread with that advice, like this one but for good practice within Envato?

http://audiojungle.net/forums/thread/ways-to-promote-your-audiojungle-music/55643

We’re in the dark as to how to tag and describe our items at the moment which means I might as well put in ‘uplifting banana’ to appear under ‘corporate motivational’ results which, I would have thought, would ‘pollute’ the search system in the long-run.

Appreciate all the communication you’ve provided so far, it’s good to have a voice from Envato providing updates on this.

Taco

490 posts
  • Referred between 50 and 99 users
  • Bought between 1 and 9 items
  • Sold between 10 000 and 50 000 dollars
  • United Kingdom
  • Has been a member for 5-6 years
tacoMusic says

Looks like the laws in the U.S. are changing. More interesting info… http://www.ascap.com/press/2014/0225-ascap-statement-on-sea.aspx

Thanks for this – I’ve looked a bit into what The Songwriter Equity Act is, but I’m still unclear on what it actually means in practice. In that article, it says this act will ‘remove one of the artificial barriers that is keeping songwriter compensation below fair market rates and creating a dramatic disparity between the compensation of music copyright holders’.

Is this act intending to increase the amount of royalties a composer would receive then? I can see in another article that songwriters and composers ‘currently receive 12 times less than the compensation record labels and artists receive for a performance / “stream,” of the same song’, but I’m not clear on what it actually means for us as royalty-free composers.

If anyone could clarify, I’d be most appreciative.

Thanks,

Taco

490 posts
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  • Bought between 1 and 9 items
  • Sold between 10 000 and 50 000 dollars
  • United Kingdom
  • Has been a member for 5-6 years
tacoMusic says

...I am always eager to finish ASAP and move on….maybe I should take my time! :)

I’m the same, but trying to focus more on the usability and mix of my tracks lately as it can be frustrating churning out tracks and then having to file them away elsewhere when they don’t get traction here. I think the old adage of quality of quantity (in terms of how useful a track is) is the key. If it’s not usable as production music, it’s not got a place on AJ I find.

490 posts
  • Referred between 50 and 99 users
  • Bought between 1 and 9 items
  • Sold between 10 000 and 50 000 dollars
  • United Kingdom
  • Has been a member for 5-6 years
tacoMusic says

Always been a fan of your work, congrats Martijn, well done on such an impressive achievement.

490 posts
  • Referred between 50 and 99 users
  • Bought between 1 and 9 items
  • Sold between 10 000 and 50 000 dollars
  • United Kingdom
  • Has been a member for 5-6 years
tacoMusic says

Yeah. :O Pretty much identical. Won’t be buying that juice. How do you like them apples?

Haha! Nice Benji.

490 posts
  • Referred between 50 and 99 users
  • Bought between 1 and 9 items
  • Sold between 10 000 and 50 000 dollars
  • United Kingdom
  • Has been a member for 5-6 years
tacoMusic says
490 posts
  • Referred between 50 and 99 users
  • Bought between 1 and 9 items
  • Sold between 10 000 and 50 000 dollars
  • United Kingdom
  • Has been a member for 5-6 years
tacoMusic says

Hi Phil, there’s an old saying “people die from exposure.” We just need a fair broadcast license here and fast. Big Business is shopping here, so Envato must provide “big business” prices, fo “big business” situations. Everyone involved in that spot was paid big time. The actors will earn 10 to 15K, The voice over may get to 10K with “residuals” kind of like a royalty every time the spot airs on national TV. The director earned 25K (or more), the guy who edited the spot or post house probably was paid 15 to 20K, The final mixing engineer billed his time out at $600 to $800 per hour (yes, this is what they pay)....etc.. The composer? $8.50 Look I watched it, the music was not the feature…I understand that. It was almost used as a “sound effect” within the story of the spot, but it certainly is worth more than $17!

+1

I used to write regularly for the advertising industry before moving more into scoring film and production music. All this talk of ‘exposure’ getting you bigger and better gigs is nonsense unless you write a hit for a big brand where the music was fundamental or becomes a hit single after being used (like Mint Royale’s Singing in the Rain remix or Jacques Your Body). I can understand it feeling good to see your work out there, but that’s pretty much where it ends when your music is sold for $17 (high five all the same Sky).

And even those types of opportunities don’t come around too often, are plagued with politics (mates of mates trying to get the job within the agency for a cut of the commission) and it is usually a famous track that is the priority for those types of campaigns in my experience. Those famous tracks are cleared at $20k+ prices depending on how famous the track is.

I was involved in one where the buyout for a year worldwide all media was $100k. Needless to say, I didn’t get it as I wasn’t as famous as the client and agency’s preferred famous choice! Anyway, back to the point, I think Zineb is right that we need broadcast license and I’m sure Envato are well aware this needs to happen soon.

490 posts
  • Referred between 50 and 99 users
  • Bought between 1 and 9 items
  • Sold between 10 000 and 50 000 dollars
  • United Kingdom
  • Has been a member for 5-6 years
tacoMusic says

I’d love to think I can reach a milestone like this, but I think it would take my entire lifetime to do so, and even then the conditions will likely have changed meaning it’s harder to reach Elite level.

490 posts
  • Referred between 50 and 99 users
  • Bought between 1 and 9 items
  • Sold between 10 000 and 50 000 dollars
  • United Kingdom
  • Has been a member for 5-6 years
tacoMusic says

Hey Alumo, Thanks for the information. When someone comes from your soundcloud page to AJ and purchases that track do you get affiliate referral income? Or is the affiliate program something all together different? I’m still a bit confused with this topic. I want to set up my SC account with links to the tracks, but I’m not sure if I should link it to that song or use the affiliate referral url that AJ supplies.

Hi jinglepopmusic,

I also do this and it’s basically a case of copying your AJ referral / affiliate link and pasting it into the ‘buy now’ field in Soundcloud. I also add it to my description so it’s clear.

It’s a good idea to get into the habit of putting those referral links everywhere there’s a potential sale, so in YouTube, you’d put it in the description, tweet your referral links etc.

You just want people to click that link and make a purchase as, assuming you were the only person whose referral link was clicked in the last 30 days, it means you’ll get 30% of the amount they deposit in their account to purchase anything on Envato.

You are essentially ‘referring’ someone to the site and earning a commission. Hope that clears things up.

Cheers,

Taco

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