Posts by jhunger

1035 posts Go Acoustic!
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
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jhunger
says



If I don’t register my tracks with AdRev, ultimately someone else will – in their name.
To deal with this I’ve uploaded my tracks to my own YouTube channel so I would know if somebody else register them in a Content ID system :)

So you mean wait until a copyright claim appears on your videos? If so, yes that could work I suppose. But still a lot of hassle and then you have all the long winded red tape to go through to get it removed, etc.. All to appease a handful of entitled customers. I’ll take the hit thanks.

If anyone is interested in the exact hassle, here is an example taken from an actual experience:

1. Paying Customer contacts you that his YouTube video got flagged with a copyright notice indicating your song.
2. Through a series of emails the customer sends you some extended information. “[Some Song Title You’ve Never Heard Of]” sound recording administered by [some music distributor].
3. You let Paying Customer know that you’re on it (even though you have no freaking idea of what to do at this point) and that you’ll keep him informed.
4. You track down the song, and find that somebody has taken your track, sung some lyrics over it, renamed it, and submitted it to [some music distributor].
5. So, you track down the people who posted it (if you’re lucky) and send them a note to ask to remove the song. OR, you just go straight to step 6.
6. You create a DMCA notice, make sure you’ve got all the legal text exactly correct.
7. You look up [some music distributor]’s site, figure out who to send it to, and send it along.
8. If you’re lucky and there are no challenges, within a few weeks you’ll get the song removed. Problem solved! Until the next time it happens.

Note that until step 8, the parties that preempted your track are making money off of your song being used in YouTube videos created by your paying customers. Also note that steps 1-8 can span far more than than 24-96 hours.

Just trying to reiterate here that although I absolutely respect and understand authors who are declaring that their tracks are AdRev free, there are no guarantees at all that their customers will never get a 3rd party copyright notice. It just means that when it happens it will be far more difficult on both the author and the customer to deal with.

Fortunately for me, the three times this has happened to me (I may be currently experiencing a fourth, BTW – I’m waiting to hear back from a customer whether it’s my non-AdRev submitted song that’s causing his notice), the parties who pre-empted my songs didn’t know they were doing anything wrong and were generally cooperative. I only needed to actually submit a DMCA once.

In any case, this is just too much hassle. I know it seems like we’re beating a dead horse with all these AdRev threads lately, but I am grateful for all the discussions on this difficult issue – I feel like it’s slowly guiding me to making a decision one way or another.

1035 posts Go Acoustic!
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Made it to the Authors' Hall of Fame
  • Had an item featured on Envato Market
+5 more
jhunger
says

Hey Paul,

Sorry, but it still looks broken. This is an https URL – is it possible you’re only seeing it because you’re logged into dropbox or the share is only visible to you? You could try PhotoBucket if dropbox isn’t working out.

1035 posts Go Acoustic!
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Made it to the Authors' Hall of Fame
  • Had an item featured on Envato Market
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jhunger
says

I’m curious as well about what kind of solution we’re imagining here, actually, and I’m not trying to be facetious in any way, but really don’t know what to do myself. In a way it was a lot easier when there were no checks at all on illegal use – at least that way I could throw my hands up and say “what are you gonna do?”

I respect the decision of Sky and others who are swearing off AdRev, but although the great majority of my tunes are also AdRev free (I have a handful up on Audiam as a trial) I don’t think I could guarantee that I would never eventually submit them. Honestly, I think the real solution is for YouTube to provide a better experience for people who have valid licenses, dealing with it on the front end rather than the presumed guilty approach which is frankly pretty threatening.

As for the “song and dance,” we are musicians after all… But seriously, we’re not making up the illegal usage issue. For instance:

  • I did a google search just now on my profile name and found several sites listing my songs for download without my permission. Just about anybody on AJ with any number of sales can probably do the same.
  • The 3 songs I’ve received reports on from Audiam clearly yielded hundreds of illegal uses in a month. I have probably about 500 songs for sale under various profiles and sites – extrapolating that the illegal use is actually quite staggering
  • Worse, and sorry to harp on this in yet another thread, I’ve had others digitally fingerprint my works, and paying clients have been dinged for copyright violations of those people’s “works.” This is the main reason I’m considering using Audiam or AdRev’s service for all of my tunes. To repeat myself from elsewhere – unwinding these situations are far and away worse for me and my paying clients than the usually less than 24 hours it’s taken me to clear songs through Audiam.
1035 posts Go Acoustic!
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Made it to the Authors' Hall of Fame
  • Had an item featured on Envato Market
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jhunger
says

This isn’t as polished, but you could check out the ZenProAudio Clip-A-Lator:

http://www.zenproaudio.com/clipalator
1035 posts Go Acoustic!
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Made it to the Authors' Hall of Fame
  • Had an item featured on Envato Market
+5 more
jhunger
says

To break it down (for the non-exclusive case):

  • Song price = 18.00
  • Buyer’s Fee (20% of the song price) = 3.60
  • Song price – Buyer’s Fee = 14.40
  • Author’s Commission (36% of the song price) = 6.48
  • Author’s Fee (44% of the song price) = 7.92

Here is some more information, though this might not be the latest link. You can also go to your earnings page and at the bottom there’s a link to the fee breakdown.

There’s also quite a few forum threads in the Notices from the last few months on the changes that it might make sense to catch up on.

1035 posts Go Acoustic!
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Made it to the Authors' Hall of Fame
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jhunger
says

I’ll start by saying I have no clue :). But I’m glad you posted this, because literally I had never even thought of doing something like it and now I’m curious. There appear to be a couple of places that allow you to publish and sell your sheet music online (didn’t want to post links even though I’m pretty sure these aren’t competitors, but just googling “where to publish sheet music” brings them up).

Also, you may want to check out a self publisher for books, like lulu.com. I have used them before for a novel and was pretty happy with the service. I haven’t tried publishing sheet music, but it looks like other authors have if you browse through their for sale section.

Just curious – what software are you using to transcribe your music (or are you doing it by hand :))?

1035 posts Go Acoustic!
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Made it to the Authors' Hall of Fame
  • Had an item featured on Envato Market
+5 more
jhunger
says

Antonio, I think you’ve described all of 2014 to me! Outside of the music scene, I’ve had a lot of stuff go on this year – all good, but time, money and energy sucks. We went through a big home remodel that was supposed to be 10-14 days and missed that mark by 6 months, complete with a bulldozer in the front yard for most of that time. We started becoming a laughing stock in the neighborhood, and when they finally came to take it away, a crowd formed and there was applause.

Anyway, even though I have a much better studio space now my energy level at the end of the day, after work, family and walking the dog, has not been there for a while. I’m really proud of some of the stuff I’ve done this year from a composition and production standpoint, but I know it’s hardly commercial as much of it is introspective guitar work. I just haven’t had the heart for much ukulele and have not whistled into a mic for a long long time.

I agree as well that it can sometimes be discouraging when some of your colleagues are so accomplished and versatile. Maybe discouraged is not the right word, but I’m still learning as I go and continue to be humbled by the talent that is appearing here daily.

I think Matt touched on a few things that I’m experiencing as well. The first couple of years of stock were a complete blast for me, and I had slim idea of what I was doing but didn’t care so much – it was just so much fun to be making music and getting paid for it! But lately I think it isn’t music that I’m burned out on, but the fact that it’s always stock music. I really do enjoy it – don’t get me wrong. However, I think that I may need to force myself to take a step back into other kinds of composition and recording, e.g. maybe in 2015 I should finally try to create an album complete with lyrics and get it up on Spotify et. al. I haven’t done this since I started back in the studio because it feels like opportunity cost, but maybe it’s a necessary step to taking production to another level, and just keeping my head in the game.

Anyway, interesting thread! It’s sometimes good to hear that you’re not the only one experiencing a lull :)

1035 posts Go Acoustic!
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Made it to the Authors' Hall of Fame
  • Had an item featured on Envato Market
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jhunger
says

5-10 tracks per song for nearly my entire portfolio. Sometimes just one or two. But my stuff is very simple – not full orchestras or anything. 40 tracks and my poor old computer would just burst sadly into flames.

1035 posts Go Acoustic!
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Made it to the Authors' Hall of Fame
  • Had an item featured on Envato Market
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jhunger
says

I think that I will just be giving it away now (yeah baby), I do like money but not taxation without (Cause I don’t vote) representation! lol This has been the best forum so far for me and I may decide to be a non-author soon. I’m just starting a reverbnation account with the same user name as here, in case you may need music for your porn-oh-oh-oh-lower-yeah-that’s-the-spot home movies! lol PS send me a copy or link! lol :)

Hey StoneColed, if you’re still around… the last I heard was that Envato was delaying the US tax reporting until they learned more about the ramifications, so to my understanding they’re not going to start Jan 1. So maybe stick around a little bit more…? I mean, you’re making a lot of people really sad, including James Van Der Beek apparently.

(Also, you’re supposed to pay taxes regardless of Envato reporting)

(Also, you should vote! Otherwise it just gets worse and worse.)

1035 posts Go Acoustic!
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Made it to the Authors' Hall of Fame
  • Had an item featured on Envato Market
+5 more
jhunger
says

So, the author’s choice is,

1) use AdRev in the hope of capturing lost revenue due to people stealing their work while fully understanding that their legitimate customers are being sent take-down notices as if they were also stealing the work

2) not use AdRev because the loss of important, honest customers like koster is too great a price to pay for catching others who steal our work

For me, #2 is a super easy choice to make! None of my royalty-free music is registered with AdRev for this very reason! For me, it is never an option to inconvenience or worse, allow my customers to be accused of theft in order to solve my problem with pirates!

Choice #2 was an easy choice for me as well until I ran into multiple instances where other people had registered my songs with AdRev. Believe me, the process of unwinding this situation is far worse for both me and my customers than my just telling AdRev (or Audiam in my case) to clear the video, which has in my experience taken at most 24 hours, and usually far less.


As far as the use of AdRev its all we got at the moment track illegal usage and give protection or at least a little compensation which dare I say is actually deserved. If you saw the numbers you would be shocked to see how many stolen instances of my music there is, it snowballs. I got people/companies using watermarked versions, playing it in the background while recording their video, recording it with a cell phone and playing it back, it’s crazy.

No kidding! I currently am getting reports for only 3 songs I put up originally (it takes a few months for them to come in). It’s eye opening – 40 page PDFs with tiny, tiny print listing all the hits. As far as I can tell, abuse is widespread.

I’ve mentioned this in another thread, but I am tiptoeing into this – currently about 7% of my portfolio is registered with Audiam (about 1% until last month). I’m glad that video producers are taking the time to post their experiences, because we need to know what it’s like on the other side. And I agree, the experience for the video producer is not optimal – YouTube doesn’t use friendly language, quite threatening actually, noting that the risk of losing a dispute could result in the loss of your channel.

So what is an author to do? I believe that most of us will be using a service like this soon, and those who aren’t will have to deal with increasing cases where they’re filling out DMCAs to prevent other people from registering their songs (I’ve had to do this thrice now – after the third time I decided to start with Audiam). On the one hand it’s becoming more and more necessary to protect one’s intellectual property, but on the other, you end up with upset clients with, I agree, a legitimate complaint – but only insofar as either the direct client or their clients don’t understand what is happening, why authors are using AdRev, or how to resolve it.

I believe as mentioned by others is that the answer is not to abstain from AdRev et. al., but to provide (and urge Envato and other marketplaces to provide) much better communication around the process. I also feel that YouTube needs to use more user friendly language around the dispute process, and also the ability to attach a license or something to preempt the situation entirely.

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