Posts by danharper

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danharper says

You may like my GamePress 3 or GamePress 2 themes (3 is a ‘spiritual successor’ to 2).

gp3 includes a “games portal” which allows you to tag all your news posts, reviews, features etc. to a game page which links to all the posts belonging to that specific game, just like a lot of review sites like IGN do :)

352 posts
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danharper says

Instead of exploding the date field to extract the year, month and day, use the following in your SQL :

SELECT
  year(`date`) as 'year',
  month(`date`) as 'month',
  day(`date`) as 'day'
FROM `your_table`;

Now, instead of returning a `date` field, SQL returns a three separate `year`, `month` and `day` fields.

Alternatively, if you would rather do this on the PHP side instead of in SQL :

// assuming $date is already set to the SQL `date` field
$unixTimeStamp = strtotime($date);
$year    = date('Y', $unixTimeStamp);
$month = date('m', $unixTimeStamp);
$day     = date('d', $unixTimeStamp);
352 posts
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danharper says

As twi said, use the date type. See this page in the MySQL documentation for differences between ‘date’, ‘datetime’ and ‘timestamp’ and examples of how to use them.

As the documentation mentions, you can insert data into a ‘date’ column is many ways (eg. ‘yyyymmdd’, ‘yy/mm/dd’, ‘yyyy.mm.dd’ etc.)

You can then use the date_format function when retrieving date fields to specify a format to display the date in (you could also create pseudo ‘year’, ‘month’ and ‘day’ fields in your SELECT to save extracting this data in PHP ).

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danharper says

Style the list items with:

display: inline;
list-style: none;

And put in your original styling. :)

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danharper says
You need to design better. Seller page design isn’t so important for me. Because, I sell about 300 items with $2000 in a month generally.

Of course the quality of your items make them sell, but if ThemeForest/FlashDen etc. had an ugly design, or the design wasn’t very intuitive, people would just move on without looking at the items for sale.

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danharper says

Nice work :)

I created my own similar function a few weeks ago for a WordPress back-end framework I plan on releasing shortly.

You call it inside the loop with post_image(120, 150); (120 being a width, 150 being height).

The function will first check for an image link provided in a custom field named “image”, if it finds one, it uses that.

If it doesn’t find an image in the custom field, it will retrieve the first attached image from the post – UNLESS the current page is a single post page, at which point nothing will be displayed (you don’t want duplicate images in a post, after all).

Then, if the image it has recieved is on the same server as WordPress, the image will be processed by TimThumb and spat back out.
If it is a remote image, TimThumb is bypassed (since it can’t process remote images), and the image is resized using HTML .

Finally, if you don’t want a post image to display at all, you can set the “image” custom field to “none” and nothing will be displayed :)

Heres the post image code

P.S. Don’t mean to step on anyone’s toes, your code is great :D

352 posts
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danharper says

Because it looks a lot better and as Jonathan said, search engines prefer you to use one or the other (or risk getting your site indexed twice).

www. is a remnant of the internet which in a web browser, shouldn’t be needed. Personally, it annoys me when a company advertises their website with the ‘www.’ – even more so on TV/Radio adverts.

What’s even more annoying are the websites which strictly use the ‘www.’ part of the domain (eg. using http://www.example.com) and don’t set up redirections – so anyone going to http://example.com will see a blank page.

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danharper says

I’d bet that the vast majority of authors here just use some form of text editor – not necessarily Notepad, because it offers no syntax highlighting or anything to make the code easier to read.

Personally, I’m on a Mac and use TextMate. Even if you’re on Windows, take a look at some screenshots of it to see the sort of apps we use – it’s just a plain-looking text editor, with syntax highlighting and some macros to speed-up regularly used code.

A lot of text editors also provide code suggestion when writing CSS etc.

Just hit the ‘Code’ tab in Dreamweaver, that’s basically what we use. And then tabbing into Firefox and use ‘Firebug’ (a Firefox extension) to debug code.

But it’s nice to hear the thoughts of one of the top buyers here :)

352 posts
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danharper says

The problem is essentially with Dreamweaver. Its WYSIWYG view is absolutely terrible in most versions, understands next to no web standards and is built on a terrible rendering engine.
However, I believe CS4 is now built on the Webkit (Safari/Chrome) engine, and so understands it better?

Either way, templates here are coded to the latest web standards (no tables), and so the ones which do appear nicely in older versions of Dreamweaver is purely by chance.

Since you make a living from this, learn the standards of the industry you’re working in. Take a bit of time each day to get up to speed on modern HTML and CSS practices – you seem to have experience anyway, so it shouldn’t take long to adapt.

352 posts
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danharper says

Unfortunately, I can’t see this helping very much.

  • Visitors will have to install a plugin for it to work. I don’t know about you, but if I visit a site and it asks me to install a plugin for just this site to use, I’ll more often than not leave. (there’s no way this will become common enough for the average user to visit more than one site telling them to install the plugin).
  • Most IE6 users are using it because their workplace/school won’t upgrade to something else – I’m assuming their same policy would apply to installing browser extensions.
  • The others, are largely not smart enough to install a new browser. They won’t understand how to install a plugin.

I was hoping this would be some kind of JavaScript plugin, not a client-based solution :(

Either way, major props to the Google team!

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