Posts by adammonroe

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adammonroe says

AudioJungle is easy to join but hard to keep up with. Probably if someone is new to making music, they will submit a track, get rejected, and get discouraged. Who knows what the statistics are, but I’m guessing there is probably a high drop-out rate right off the bat in regards to new users. Once you get your tracks approved, they tend to sit around for awhile, especially if you are not writing commercial or in a genre that is “in” right now. This too can be discouraging. Really, the only people left in the long-run are people who find success, people who are extremely stubborn, and people who generally just love to make music and don’t know what the hell else to do with it. :-)

When it comes time to review, the reviewers probably have some general guidelines, they might even be instructed to “keep it general,” otherwise everyone would want specific detailed descriptions with their hard rejections. Sometimes a track just doesn’t “fit” or “gel” and it’s easier to say, “doesn’t meet quality standards” or whatever than it is to point to very specific things and then possibly have the person fix those things, feel confident enough to resubmit, and the track still doesn’t “work.”

It’s also sometimes useful to submit hard rejections in the item discussion forum – If your track really sucks, people will have no reservations letting you know why and if it’s actually good everyone will start to wonder why it got rejected! It’s good to get feedback from a whole group of people rather than just one reviewer. Individuals can be flawed. Sometimes you just catch someone’s ear the wrong way on a certain day and it is as simple as that.

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adammonroe says

I’ve tried to learn how to sight read but it interferes with my playing by ear and my intuitive side. I do know how to read music but not sight read. For me personally knowing what I do know about theory is enough and if know too much it will interfere with my creativity. I think it was Korsokov that said that creativity can make up for a lack of knowledge, but I could be slaughtering his quote.

I think when it’s time to be creative you have to be able to disengage from thinking too much about formal rules and just play whatever sounds good. Sight reading is just a dumb skill – by “dumb” I mean it’s just something you practice over and over again until you can do it. I like to play by ear, and it’s not hard for me to pick out melodies and transpose things, but I think part of being a good musician is constantly pushing yourself to do things that aren’t easy, so I have been trying to sight read for a few years, as I find it a challenge, and very slow to make progress.

I think creativity is the paramount skill to have when it comes to composition. You will absorb other peoples music – whether it be by simple passive listening or from studying sheets. Creativity is key in virtually any application, whether it be math, computer programming, music, science, whatever. Technical ability and theory can be improved/learned, creativity can only really be shaped and guided. :-)

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adammonroe says

Great stuff, thanks so much guys! Which brings me to another subject. Some of the greatest bluesguitar players in the world (like, for example, B.B. King) did not have access to all this theory, but still managed to become legendary just by practice and talent. Is this because the genre allows for it?

A lot of great musicians got great by listening to other people play, playing along with records, ect. I think this is extremely important when it comes to being a great musician.

A lot of great composers got great by writing music, which used to entail, well, writing out the music. Before things could be recorded, the only way you really got to hear someone piece was by playing it yourself.

It depends what your goals are. I think you can be a great musician without theory and being able to read music. Technology even allows you to be a good composer these days, but if your goal is to be a serious composer then at some point you will want to know how to read and write scores.

A little bit of a distinction between a composer and a musician, IMO. Two heads of the same coin but still different. Producing our own music we wear ALL THE HATS, music theory is applicable to all of them.

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adammonroe says

The advantage of not having to spend hours and hours on reading up on music theory ;) that’s what I would like to find out, if it’s worth donating so much time on it.

I wouldn’t think of it in those terms, I would approach it as a half hour/hour a day kind of thing. That’s how I approach learning to do anything in life – just a little bit each day, otherwise it becomes tedious and the learning doesn’t really “stick” – at least not for me. If you are serious about music, you are probably spending a few hours a day playing your instrument, sight reading, learning new chords, composing, transposing songs, developing intonation…why not add music theory to your routine. :-)

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adammonroe says

Hello, it would help if we knew what program you are using to record/compose your music. Most DAWS let you add multiple tracks to a project. You’ll want to create a new audio track and import the audiojungle watermark. If you are not using a DAW to make music you should consider getting one. :-)

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adammonroe says

Music theory is interesting and will open your mind to the mathematical beauty of western music (for example, the cycle of 4ths is just the cycle of 5ths played backwards, musical intervals are actually just mathematical ratios (a perfect fifth is a 3/2 ratio to the fundamental, or 1.5 times the Hz value {Hz are just cycles per second} – maybe they aren’t perfect ratios in equal temperament tuning, but a really good violin player will be able to play perfect ratios).

Writing and reading music makes it easier to get your ideas down and to play other peoples music. However, I think when it comes to actual composition (for me anyway) I just sit down at the piano and compose – I don’t really think about what key I’m playing in or anything until it comes time to write the music down. Sometimes it can help if you get absolutely stuck, but I try to avoid thinking about music in terms of chord progressions and things like that, because one tends to get stuck in the same patterns. Creativity comes more from letting your mind wander than it does from analyzing theory, at least for me.

Music is like anything else in life – if you don’t know the basics, how can you tastefully break the rules? A lot of interesting music is built around bending the rules (Jazz and Blues for example). Overall, I think it is good to have a fundamental grounding, and I think it helps when it comes time to learn a new instrument. It’s just one more tool in your toolbox.

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adammonroe says

Hello, you only need to upload wav files 44.1 khz sample rate 16 bit. Optionally, you can upload mp3 files at 320 kbps. They need to be in a zip file. You also need to upload an mp3 preview with a watermarked version of your wav file.

Here are the guidelines

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adammonroe says

Hi-res image scaled/resized to low-res image. Maybe a sharpen filter. My avatar is just a digital painting I did scaled down, the original resolution was in the thousands of pixels by thousands of pixels. I don’t think graphic design is particularly hard, but if you don’t have the skill set there are plenty of photoshoppers out there!

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adammonroe says

When I first started uploading here my tracks got rejected quite often, but after awhile you sort of figure out how you need to do things in order to not be rejected. Being rejected is part of the growing experience at AudioJungle.

Now, when someone has been here for a awhile, has 100+ items in their portfolio (and hundreds of sales) then I can see how they might be a little miffed following a rejection.

Overall, it makes you a better composer/musician/whatever because you suddenly become concerned about the most minute details regarding your tracks.

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adammonroe says

Hello the progression for the first track you posted is
C F Amin G Many Many times.
The second track revolves heavily around a G chord
The third track is the most interesting. I don’t think those are complete chords, I think they are harmonic intervals that go something like
CG – DG – AE – GD – FC – GD – CG – CG (mostly 5th’s).

These tracks all share:
*arpeggiated piano chords played rhythmically
*violin, usually staccato played rhythmically
*A nice beat
*They all start off slow and then the beat kicks in
*sometimes guitars and odd percussion.
*key of C.

I do not believe it should be difficult to duplicate this type of sound and feeling. Just work around some basic chord progressions in C and keep adding rhythmic notes and layering instruments until you get something that sounds similar. Good luck!

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