Posts by adammonroe

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To further drive home the point…

Why SSD’s are so much better for buffering and are becoming so important for audio production doesn’t even have much to do with faster transfer speeds (although that definitely helps) it has to do with seek times. Typical SSD seek times are measured in fractions of a millisecond, whereas in a traditional hard drive, average seek times might be 6-10 ms or more. That doesn’t mean that a traditional HDD will always take that long to seek (hopefully all your sample data is contained in one section of the hard drive) but the arm is going to have to move at least a little, creating some latency. Now, think about using low sample buffers, say 128 samples-per-buffer. Your audio latency is about 6 ms…Is a traditional hard drive going to be able to seek and read all that data in less than 6 ms if it has to? Of course you can alleviate some of this with good programming/multi-threading/good buffering algorithms but there is a physical limit to how much data can be read in a certain amount of time. How about if there are 10 samples playing that need buffering? with low sample buffers and a traditional hard drive, it’s easy to see how playback can overshoot buffering, creating cracking/popping noises and causing audio dropouts.

You can get an external SSD for your Macbook and as long as you are using USB 3.0 or Thunderbolt you will see some good performance gains.

Again the CPU thing…CPU’s are getting quite fast these days. That’s not to say a CPU can’t bottleneck your audio setup, especially if you are relying more on actual virtual instruments, effects, ect, and less on sample libraries, but if you are using sample libraries heavily, especially orchestral sample libraries, hard drive transfer speed and seek rates start to become the central issue.

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David, Most of the time in situations like this you’ll usually get a “your accent is too heavy for the English speaking market,” note, so I’m surprised the reviewer didn’t give you such feedback. It’s not as bad as some other tracks I’ve heard, I can at least make out what your saying.

I like the track but maybe it is a bit on the short side too? You want it to keep going then it just ends…but it’s probably mostly the accent.

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i think if you have another home for them, why not, especially with tracks that aren’t performing here. i usually wait a month to see how a track is doing before i consider moving it. i’ve cleaned out a lot over the time i’ve been here, though most of those were early ones, after learning what actually sells here. that being said, if you don’t have another place to put them, might as well leave em. i don’t think most clients come to our pages or start surfing through our portfolios and get turned off by zero sellers. i think they either just go to top weekly sellers, or do a keyword search, and in that case, sheer numbers are probably an advantage – though it’s hard to know for sure – there are some huge portfolios here that aren’t really selling and some tiny ones that are selling like crazy, so it’s a bit luck of the draw, too. could that have been a more convoluted answer? haha…forgive me, i’m packing and cleaning like a madmonkey…

I think you are right. This topic gets brought up a lot and I think it is a good example of counter-intuitive thinking. Increase your sales by decreasing the amount of items you have for sale…does that make sense? I think people over-emphasize the importance of portfolios. Probably most people buying music are just browsing tracks on a track-by-track basis, not listening to entire portfolios. Sure, there are probably some people who dig your sound enough to go through your portfolio, but then, why would they care about non-selling tracks? They would probably think, “Hey, this track is really good and suits my needs, I can’t believe no one has bought it yet, I just have to have it!” I’d wager the majority of people browsing portfolios are probably other authors, so perhaps your time is better spent marketing and/or producing music than obsessing about how clean your portfolios is. I don’t believe there is a metric on Audio Jungle that takes your number of sales and divides them by your number of tracks. I have purchased one or two items on the Audio Jungle market and it was by typing in keywords, listening to a bunch of different tracks by different people, and picking the one that sounded best and that fit my needs. Then again, I don’t sell much here, so maybe I don’t know what I’m talking about. :)

Of course if you have an exclusive account that’s a different issue.

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I don’t think you need a slave computer to gain an advantage. I have my sample libraries split between two SSD drives in the same computer and it seems to help. Are you using SSD drive(s)? SSD drives go a long way towards helping alleviate this issue. Hard drive read speeds are usually more of a bottleneck than anything else – you could have 2000 Gigs of Ram and a blazing fast CPU, but sample libraries usually aren’t programmed to take advantage of all that memory or processing speed, they will still constantly stream from the hard drive. Of course using a lot of reverb plugins and processing will make the CPU start to factor in.

I have 32 Gigs of Ram and an i5 @ 3.3 gHz. Sometimes I still have issues with the full orchestra at 128 sample buffers or lower, but for tracking it is fine. I am using almost all Spitfire stuff, which is a GIGANTIC RESOURCE HOG (blending 5 mic positions on some of these instruments). These days, Vienna is comparatively a lightweight when it comes to resource consumption, so I’m not sure if network support or slave computers matter there anymore.

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Well friend, there are two things I have learned after countless Audio Jungle rejections. The first is that sometimes your music is good, but it’s just not a good fit for Audio Jungle…even if it were approved, you probably wouldn’t sell any copies. The second is that it pays to be obsessive with your tracks. I might go over the same track two hundred times listening for things that sound slightly off or that need to be adjusted – the kinds of things that most people probably wouldn’t notice, but having had so many rejections here, I am forced to notice. Tweaking velocities, adjusting timings, making sure everything sounds tight, but not TOO TIGHT, ect. Sometimes it’s dealing with sample library noise, sometimes it’s slightly tweaking an arrangement. Getting a track to 95% is easy, getting it to sound 99% to 100% perfect is the real trick, and you bet the reviewers notice the extra blood sweat and tears required for that last 5% Sometimes you will work miracles and make a 100% awesome track and it just doesn’t hit the reviewers ear exactly right that day. Oh well, 20-30 hours of work down the drain, but such is life.

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How did you go so long without a keyboard?!? Yes, it should speed up your production by a factor of at least 10 if you can play the piano well.

I have a Yamaha CP-50 which is more of a gigging keyboard, overpriced, and is a bit lacking in terms of being a midi controller (could really use a mod wheel) but has some of the best action I’ve ever seen. As such, I can’t recommend it. I WOULD HIGHLY recommend a controller with a full 88 keys – you will use them if you plan on using instruments in the lower range (Basses, Contra basses, Tubas, ect) and the higher ranges (flutes, piccolos, violins,ect). It will save you a great bit of time having to transpose things up and down the piano roll. Faders meh, pads meh. I would spring for weighted action and 88 keys over those kinds things, but I guess it all comes down to what kind of music you are making; if you are doing a lot of synth works, extra sliders and knobs probably help out a lot.

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I don’t really use Logic/Mac much beyond developing Audio Units, but the big issue with Yosemite for me was that it broke the drivers for my Midisport 2×2 and it was a few months before M-Audio released updated drivers. I would make sure all the hardware you use wasn’t broken by Yosemite, and if it was, that updated drivers have been released.

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1. Yes, composition can be learned, but I think the more important aspect is CREATIVITY. I don’t know if CREATIVITY can be learned, I think some people just have it in more abundance than others, and it factors into everything you do in life, whether it be music, art, programming, mathematical equations, engineering, whatever. What I mean by CREATIVITY is the ability to sit down at the piano (or your chosen instrument) and come up with completely new melodies and arrangements without giving it much thought, more-or-less just letting your mind wander enough until you arrive at something good, or at least at something new. IMO, composition is just the flip-side of creativity; being able to edit and shape your CREATIVITY, and to push yourself to finish what your wandering mind has begun. COMPOSITION is the disciplinary foil to CREATIVITY. If you are a naturally creative person you will know it. Personally, I can’t go more than a day or two without making something, building something, writing something, or working on something, be it music or whatever else I happen to be doing. Inaction drives me crazy. This is the other part of life’s equation; having drive and ambition.

2. I think there is great merit in figuring-out other people’s music, playing it, and/or covering it. I don’t think there is much merit in sitting down and studying it in an analytical or cerebral sort of way…analyzing music like that is better left to musicologists and not composers. If you are playing the notes, you are subconsciously absorbing the intervals, the harmonic structure, the chordal changes, ect. Of course, if you are listening to an orchestra or something, and following along with a score, it will obviously teach you something about orchestration.

3. Experience? Sure it matters, because I think the more experience you have producing music other people want to buy and/or hear, the less likely you are to waste time indulging in your own anachronistic tendencies. At a certain point you’ll probably realize something like, “Well, I really like the stuff I’m writing, and I’m challenging myself creatively, but it’s just not what most people are going to buy or want to hear.” A long the way you’ll have figured out that simpler almost always means better, because the population as a whole isn’t really that well-versed in the musical language, the extreme importance of trends, and the modern emphasis on production over composition. I think that kind of thing can only come from experience, and the ability to force oneself to make music not for oneself but for other people, or for markets, can take some time to develop.

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BTW I’m an iLok fan! :)

Haha….good for you :)

Only joking about the ilok really :) If you read all of the Soundfix post…i think that’s one of the most amusing posts in the last couple of years along with Dollar and Jeremy of course…imo, Mat’s pics really made me chuckle :bigsmile:

Personally i hate the whole dongle thing, i’d rather be restricted to the use of one computer which is ok for me as most of the stuff i do is in my own studio. It’s a bit off topic but i think the waves copy protection system is really good as it gives you options, it also gives you the option to add your licenses on your own usb stick, thats the way to go for me :) I’m sure you already know that though…just putting it out there.

ILok is crap, I never pass up an opportunity to badmouth ILok and Pace. If your ILok breaks, they want to charge you double the cost of a new one to replace it and transfer your licenses, what a scam!

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Fun fact, there are really only 24 major and minor keys (one minor and one major for each key on the piano), but if you build keys on the cycle of fourths and fifths (and take into account C Major and A minor), you end up with 30 keys, why? Because some of them are redundant, and have enharmonic equivalents. C-Flat Major for example – most people would just call that B Major, and indeed, The 5 accidentals in B Major are easier to keep track of than the 7 accidentals in C-Flat major, but the notes in each key are identical. Likewise, most people will take D-Flat major over C-Sharp Major, again we have 5 accidentals vs 7.

The thing I’ve always wondered about though, and what keeps me up at night is F-Sharp vs G-Flat. Same exact number of accidentals – one is sharp and one is flat – but is either key redundant? Does it matter? Anyway take away the six major/minor keys that are enharmonic equivalents and you get 30-6=24. Magic!

All that being said, I tend not to think about keys too much and just focus on melody, harmony, and intervals – the key only really comes into play when I go to notate my music, and usually I end up having to pick the “closest” key and add some accidentals here and there. I don’t think you even need to stick to a key to have a commercial or successful sounding track.

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