Posts by adammonroe

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adammonroe says

It should be fairly easy to spot from a melody perspective. I don’t think it’s possible to generate a complicated, beautiful, and unique melody procedurally, so a melody that lasts longer than a measure or two should be pretty good assurance that it wasn’t made by a program. Ditto for music that features solos. Unfortunately, not much stock music needs to be melodic or have solos, so yes, it’s going to be a daunting task to weed out procedurally generated music!

HOWEVER, nothing on their website that I can see has any information about pricing. If it is a web-based service, it will probably be on a per-track basis, and since the website talks about royalties for “session musicians” I imagine they probably don’t want their procedurally generated music being resold on stock music sites and probably won’t grant a license to do so.

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adammonroe says

Looks positively boring. Guys, get ready for an already over-saturated market to become positively flooded. What happens when you type in Hans Zimmer? :-)

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adammonroe says


Windows 8.1 …. I’m using Ableton Live 64-bit and since I have a lot of 32 bit plugins I have to use jBridge for making those 32bit working in 64-bit DAW. Back when I had W7 everything worked fine with jBridge, but on W8 I’m still not able to make it work..It just won’t appear in Ableton Live..:(

Thanks to all for the replies!

JohnyRainbow, Cubase 7 has bridge installed in it for using 32-bit as 64-bit so I don’t need to have jBridge installed on my PC. If I use some plug-ins or VST that do not have 64-bit support dll (like many free VST’s and plug-ins), I just copy the 32-bit dll into the program files (64-bit) folder and it works fine in Cubase 7 64 bit.

Now, this is not perfect and some software crushes often, but I hear that this can happen with jBridge too?

Sonar also has a built-in bridge for 32 bit plugins. Too bad a lot of these plugin developers aren’t around, because it literally takes 2 seconds to switch to a 64 bit build (in Visual Studio) and compile a 64-bit DLL. I’m going to assume most people are using 64 bit Windows at this point, as the 4 GIG RAM limit on 32-bit windows is a real bummer.

And I’m using Windows 7.

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adammonroe says

I think it does get a bit weird when you have a thousand tracks with the same title. On the one hand, if you name your track something generic, you are competing with those thousand other tracks of the same name, on the other, if you name your tracks something obscure, no one will ever find them.

But hell, the whole system is weird to me; why would anyone want to purchase a track that already has 500 sales? Don’t they realize that there are already 500 projects out there with the same music? Is it just the reptilian brain thinking, “hmmmm, this has 500 sales, must be 500 times better than everything else?”

Yes, I believe that is the way the human brain works.

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adammonroe says

I’m sure you guys have noticed that this http://youtu.be/4GdhcgKycMk?t=59s Sounds a little like this… http://youtu.be/DOFgFAcGHQc?t=3m15s and they both of sound a bit like this… http://youtu.be/L0bcRCCg01I?t=6m56s

Anyone else ever notice that?

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adammonroe says

The authoring guide used to specifically state no solo-instrument tracks (with the exception of piano) now it says no solo instruments with only one note played at a time. I’m interpreting this to mean piano is ok, finger-picking guitar is ok, as long as there is sufficient complexity (IE harmony/chords+melody).

http://support.envato.com/index.php?/Knowledgebase/Article/View/292

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adammonroe says


As someone who dabbles a bit in the sample-library business myself, I say you can’t go wrong sampling a nice piano. Remember, people can always buy drums, banjos, guitars, trumpets…whatever, but not too many people can afford to go out and buy a grand piano, let alone have the space for it. You can never have too many piano libraries, and every piano will sound a bit different. Piano players love piano libraries, and it’s the by far the easiest thing to script/program. As a musician/composer, you can always think about what kind of sample instrument you would like, that’s where the best virtual instruments come from.

I’m actually quite surprised that so many sample companies continue to make piano libraries. There are already so many of them on the market. With the market so saturated in piano libraries, how does a company justify the expense of putting in the time and financial resources to create yet another one? Unless it offers something the others don’t, I don’t see the benefit.

I personally have a few piano libraries (I bought Komplete 9 Ultimate so I have everything that came with that) and I feel like I’m pretty much covered for everything I could ever need. I find that I use The Giant most, but I also have Spitfire Audio’s Felt Piano (not the one you get with a donation, but the actual release) for the more intimate, cinematic tracks. The only other ones I’d consider purchasing would be ones that offer effects of some sort that alter the timbre of the instrument considerably and give it an extremely unique sound that I can’t get elsewhere.

I’m not a professional piano player, so I guess the various types of pianos that have been sampled offer enough sonic variation to warrant the purchases. Is that how you feel? :)

Every piano has a different tone. A Fazioli will sound different from a Steinway, but even a Fazioli will sound different from a same model Fazioli given specific circumstances and how it’s recorded. It’s a bit like a guitar tone; there are already thousands of pedals and hundreds of amps to choose from, but a guitar player will always be looking for that next pedal or amp to tweak his tone just a bit. After awhile, you tend to get tired of the same piano sound (at least I do), especially if you write a lot of piano-heavy music, or music where the piano is the only instrument.

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adammonroe says

Prelinger archive has tons of stuff (old movies, stock footage, ect.)

https://archive.org/details/prelinger

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adammonroe says

As someone who dabbles a bit in the sample-library business myself, I say you can’t go wrong sampling a nice piano. Remember, people can always buy drums, banjos, guitars, trumpets…whatever, but not too many people can afford to go out and buy a grand piano, let alone have the space for it. You can never have too many piano libraries, and every piano will sound a bit different. Piano players love piano libraries, and it’s the by far the easiest thing to script/program.

As a musician/composer, you can always think about what kind of sample instrument you would like, that’s where the best virtual instruments come from.

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adammonroe says

I’d have to agree about the vocal line sounding a bit unnatural. I’d replace it with Violins I or a theremin-type sound. The second track is fine, but maybe it’s just too short? I know whenever I’ve tried to upload short bits of music in the past I usually don’t get good feedback.

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