Posts by adammonroe

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adammonroe says

In modern popular music composer is not as important as the arranger. In the first place a trendy sound. Melody in last place. This is my opinion …

Yes this is true if you are talking about music made for the club/dance music/rap ect, which are indeed very popular forms of music right now, because the music is more rhythm and production based than sitting down and actually “composing” a piece of music. I believe most of this music is more or less written well it is being recorded…whereas in the past a songwriter would bring a rough sketch of his music into the studio, I believe now a lot of it is done by the seat-of-the-pants. But at that point I wouldn’t call that person an “arranger” I’d call the important person, “the producer” because they are deftly skilled at things like music production and knowing what the popular sounds are at any given moment, and they can be greatly skilled at reproducing the sound of what is selling. Also, there is probably not much pre-existing material to arrange. Maybe an “artist” has their lyrics and vague idea of a song, but I don’t think many of them have any musical ideas fleshed out. In hip-hop that person (in the past) probably had to be very familiar with various recorded music and figure out who they wanted to sample, now hip-hop has sorta moved away from sampling old records and towards synths/workstations/things of that nature. I’d say the sound dominating music right now, mainstream and indie music is synthesizers, and with indie bands you see a resurgence of things like Rhodes, Wulitzers, ect…but now I am getting off the topic.

As most of us here have to fill the role of composer and producer/engineer, it would be interesting to see different peoples methods of working. Most of the time I’ll have a rough sketch of what I want to accomplish punched up on the piano, but sometimes I’ll just make it up as I’m recording.

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adammonroe says

That’s a lot of sales for two years. That’s more than a lot of restaurants pull. Good job.

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adammonroe says

My song is fairly similar. A little more up-tempo. Note that there are versions with and without drums.

Proud Billy – http://audiojungle.net/item/proud-billy/2775246

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adammonroe says

IMO , thirty percent is fine. What Envato might think about doing is having a sort of “promotion” week every year (do they already do this? Have they done this?) where they raise the referral rate a bit higher to entice people to promote the site. maybe they lose out on a lot of money that week, but maybe the site gains a lot of new customers? Might be worth trying if they haven’t tried it already?

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adammonroe says

Most of these are pretty decent, some of them are probably a little too experimental for Audio Jungle’s taste. I’m guessing a lot of them probably got rejected for reasons of tone? For example, a song like “Sky High” is fine from a compositional standpoint, but the sound of the bass drum probably deviates a little too far from the standard bass-drum sound for Audio Jungle’s taste. Also things like the white noise on some of the tracks – I’m sure Audio Jungle doesn’t see the artistic value in it, they just hear the white noise.

I think Candy, Drive Us Away, Sky High, and Skyrocket are good tracks, and Oborozuki is simply beautiful. Skyrocket has a definite Nobuo Uematsu flavor to it, and Oborozuki is actually almost mind-blowing.

For me, it’s always kinda of a crap-shoot when it comes to what work of mine gets approved and what gets rejected. But at the end of the day, I’m glad to have an impartial set of ears on Audio Jungle to critique and comment on my work. Yeah, they might be grading it on a somewhat commercially slanted scale, but you will usually get honest feedback from these guys, which can be valuable, because when you ask for feedback from friends and family, it is almost always biased in your favor.

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adammonroe says

Arranging usually refers to orchestration, but also applies to things like arranging music for Marching Band, adding or changing instruments, ect. But you need to begin with a harmonic and melodic framework.

A great classic example of arrangement is Maurice Ravels orchestration of Modest Mussorgsky’s Pictures At an Exhibition.

Arrangement can also work the other way; for example, you could take a complex symphony and arrange it for piano.

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adammonroe says

Getting a slight Jon Brion vibe, which is a good thing.

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adammonroe says

To me, you are either writing commercial music or you are writing music that’s an avenue for self-expression. Both kinds of music are difficult to write.

I find writing commercial-style music difficult because it is very hard to write something in a minimalistic way and have it still sound engaging/catchy. A lot of it comes down to production and engineering, as far as choosing the exact right instruments and mixing them perfectly. Often you are shooting for an overall feel, rather than specific melodic or harmonic content. Less-is-more can be a difficult thing to achieve.

Music that is more personal is also difficult, because in a way it’s your statement to the world, and you might judge it against a higher standard than you would commissioned or commercial music. That’s not to say a higher production standard, but a higher standard of creativity.

However, one should infuse everything one does with their own personal style, and invariably one will (how can it be avoided?) All great composers have their hallmark sound.

I believe the key to being a well-rounded and sane composer is trying to write music in a variety of styles and on a number of themes. Even commercial-sounding music can vary a great deal from song to song. If one starts producing the same music over and over, be it artistically or commercially, then one is sure to feel unfulfilled, and one’s work is sure to suffer…and the world is to suffer, because everything starts to sound mediocre and homogenized.

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adammonroe says

Nice. You don’t typically hear a lot of harpsichord on the old Audio Jungle.

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adammonroe says

If you want to make a lot of money, that must be place with lot of people, so China and India are best I think :)

Lol. 1/3 of the world’s population right there.

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