Posts by adammonroe

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adammonroe says

You don’t have to convince me – I like money – but I doubt they would increase their prices that much. Maybe shoot for a realistic, incremental increase – $2 or $3 dollars. They were going to increase the price to $16 a little while back, but decided not to do it.

Look here.

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adammonroe says

The two most important things, IMO , are good playing technique and mixing practices. You need to use the mod wheel to control expression/velocity crossfading and (preferably) key switches to control articulation. Not 100% sure how East West lets you do these things – I’m assuming you purchased the standard orchestral library, not HOLLYWOOD strings or anything?

East-West stuff comes pre-mixed to a degree, but you can still customize it.

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adammonroe says

Are they charging $30 for one time use on things like youtube videos and websites, or does that $30 cover everything? Because that’s what the standard (cheap) license covers here. Audiojungle also offers an extended license, which can cost as much as $70 per item.

And I don’t necessarily agree with companies not caring about a few dollars. Large corporations might not, but small businesses trying to squeeze every dollar might be inclined to shop around.

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adammonroe says

I’m not aware of any services that will do this.

As far as copyright infringement gos, it’s my understanding that you usually have to be able to prove that the similarities were INTENTIONAL .

I think if a piece of music is written with any degree of complexity, there’s a strong mathematical improbability that it will bear significant resemblance to anything else… Although with 7 billion people on the planet, the odds are much greater than they once were. But part of being a successful musician is developing your own personal style, so that it’s easy for people to recognize your music, no matter what style or genre it’s in. It becomes something like a fingerprint, and fingerprints remain unique, even with 7 billion people.

Pretty much the only people interested in exposing similarities are going to be record-industry types who hold copyrights…because they are after money. Even if two works aren’t really that similar, if they hear enough of a similarity they will go the extra mile to try and get some money. I always like to point to the famous case of John Fogerty (from CCR ) being accused of basically copyright infringing himself.

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adammonroe says

Ehhhh, I haven’t had the best experience with Paypal. They have arbitrarily frozen my account on numerous occasions, and demanded that I fax them my ID, proof of residence, ect. I’ve had a really hard time getting them to let me use certain types of credit cards. As far as transfers, the last one I did took the standard 3 days.

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adammonroe says

I like the snare rolls throughout – that’s a nice touch – and it’s definitely epic. I think you should get some sales off of this.

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adammonroe says

Me and my girlfriend.

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adammonroe says

It’s always good to get independent feedback on what you are doing, but it’s also good to have a well-developed, personal sense of what you think is good and what you think is bad.

The most useful area where one can get criticism and feedback is on the engineering/mixing side. The composition side of things is a bit subjective, especially on a site like this – although if someone was hypothetically willing to offer someone else ideas when they got stuck, that could be quite useful.

Now we do have the item discussion thread, but it tends to be comprised of A. people wanting to get feedback on why their item wasn’t approved B. people wanting to get feedback after an item was approved, and the inevitable backlash from people complaining about how those people are self-promoting…which I don’t necessarily agree with, because what else would an item discussion thread be useful for?

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adammonroe says

While I don’t normally take the time to notate my AJ tracks, I’d hardly consider notation an archaic practice. In fact, I believe it is crucial to great orchestrations (if that’s your style).. and here’s why.

In a DAW , it is SO easy to compose with 200 violins, 100 cellos, 40 french horns, etc… but that’s not realistic or balanced (for a real orchestra).

If you understand notation and proper orchestration techniques, you can compose music using the human limitations of an orchestra – which will lend itself to a more realistic sound. AND … should you ever be called upon to produce the score, you don’t have to start from scratch and re-write the entire piece because it was composed with real players in mind.

Oh yeah, I agree with that 100%. There are composers out there I’ve heard talk about orchestration, and they’ve stated that they don’t think it’s important (whether or not a piece could actually be played by an orchestra) and that only the end result/sound is important. Guys like Rimsky-Karsakov dedicated a good portion of their lives discerning and defining the best proportions and ideal balance between instruments and instrument groups, and indeed, when people set out to develop sample libraries, the samples are usually based around these standards (for a standard orchestra, 16 first violins, 8 double basses, ect, scaling up and down slightly for larger or smaller orchestras.) Orchestration is more or less about balance and color.

However, I think the trend in modern orchestration seems to be to explore percussion, and to deeply layer percussion beyond what a typical orchestra might be equipped to play, in order to achieve the “epic sound.” It works to an extent because the music is being produced for things like movies and game trailers, so you need to immediately grab someones attention, or make something feel “epic” without having the benefit of it having came from a more subtle piece of music proceeding it. So in this one particular instance, I think we have an example of music sounding less realistic in a traditional sense, but because it’s what people are being exposed to, it’s becoming what people expect to hear.

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adammonroe says

My main field of study is contemporary classical music so I work with notation more often than not, actually. I don’t do much writing by hand, however, but prefer writing directly in Sibelius. When it comes to shorter orchestral works I might work with a full score from the start, but for more ambitious works I find working in a condensed score and later orchestrating the material much more comprehensive. When it comes to most of my AJ items I usually work in my DAW from the start, though – it’s usually simpler.

Can you imagine having to take the time to write all that out by hand? Especially orchestral stuff? And then every now and then you might have to make a correction, and re-write a good chunk of the score? Computers sure are great.

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