Posts by adammonroe

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adammonroe says

As far as sample libraries go, yes you will hear a lot of clicking and popping on PLAYBACK because, no matter what, at some point every sample library has to stream/buffer from the hard drive and unless you have a SSD, you are going to hear a lot of crackle crackle with playback at low latencies…unless we are talking about libraries that are small enough to fit into memory. MIXING DOWN/EXPORTING, it shouldn’t be a problem, especially if aren’t using any multi-threaded libraries, because – and I’m only 98% sure on this because I can’t say for sure exactly how every DAW is programmed – but based on what I know about programming and computers, on something with non-essential timing like mixing down or exporting, the DAW should wait for processes to complete. In other words, the DAW should wait for your sample library to buffer-in all those floats and shorts before it moves on to the next sample-buffer, because that just makes programming sense. To program it any other way would be extremely poor, half-assed programming. You’d have to go out of your way and put in extra effort to program it that badly.

I will say that I’ve had some experience with noise and pops when it comes to EFFECTS PLUGINS and TEMPO CHANGES. This is especially apparent with something like ALTIVERB. If you are using a lot of vst processing/effects plugins and have some tempo changes going on, this might be something to look at.

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adammonroe says

There is some foamy noise (I can only assume it is reverb) coming through after the percussive hits on your track(s) that sound a bit harsh/bit-crushed/lofi. It’s less noticeable in the second track, but still sticks out to me.

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adammonroe says

Fazioli Ebony Concert Grand is awesome

+1 go to piano. Just be prepared for reviewers to occasionally complain about pedal noise and such.

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adammonroe says

Nu Calypso

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adammonroe says

They better be making new libraries, with all that money they are raking in. :-) These Unicef libs always seem like a good value.

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adammonroe says

No one has had the curious experience of having a track sit around for a year and then sell?

In the end I don’t think it matters much. Like you guys say, most people probably filter by popularity and sales. The people who are willing to dig for tracks, I’m not sure it will make much of a difference having to dig through 300 tracks instead of 500 tracks. Maybe it would, who knows. Either way, the market is going to be hugely over-saturated, just based on the number of authors alone. From an author’s perspective, you probably want the most tracks on the site as you can have, because this doesn’t “clutter” your profile, it adds to your footprint. Really, the only way to get noticed is to have a big portfolio; more of your tracks will pop up in more search results and you will get more sales. Having a small portfolio full of your best selling tracks sounds like a good idea, but as an author I think you are really shooting yourself in the foot. Removing or limiting tracks won’t do anything to cull the over-saturation or the competition…everyone will just have less tracks, there will still be the same amount of authors and relative tracks and relative competition. Do most sales come from someone clicking in a search result or from someone perusing your portfolio? I’d bet the former, but I really don’t know.

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adammonroe says

This has been discussed quite a few times. The short answer is, no one really knows. The long answer is, check the sticky, “General Commercial Viability & Music Acceptance Tips” and if you still aren’t clear on what is required, listen to some approved tracks, and if that confuses you even more, well, what can you do.

Things seem to be a little more focused on the commercial viability aspect these days, as most of the people uploading know how to mix and master a track (like your track).

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adammonroe says

Get a six year old child to sing your songs, send it to Ellen Degeneres, BOOM, ONE BILLION VIEWS.

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adammonroe says

Probably not, the only thing you might be able to make sound halfway decent by adding good reverb is VSL. The problem with orchestras…some instruments (mainly strings but brass too) really need to just be recorded in a good sounding hall to begin with. At least that’s my opinion. Violin is especially troublesome. It’s not all about sound either, I think the really good libraries have a lot of articulations and little touches built in that don’t really jump out but that definitely add to the value. Most of the expense of the good libraries is recording great players in great sounding environments with great engineers.

Of course “good” and “cheap” are both subjective terms. Just because something is cheap doesn’t mean it necessarily sounds bad and just because something is expensive doesn’t mean that it sounds good, although that’s the perception. I think with smaller instruments and ensembles, you really have the opportunity to create quality stuff at different price points. With orchestral sample libraries, it’s a whole different ball game.

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adammonroe says

Yep, Mat’s a good guy.

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