Posts by adammonroe

359 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 2 years
  • Has referred 1+ members
  • Has sold $100+ on Envato Market
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
+1 more
adammonroe says

Yep, Mat’s a good guy.

359 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 2 years
  • Has referred 1+ members
  • Has sold $100+ on Envato Market
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
+1 more
adammonroe says


Sometimes rejection is because of low quality, but once in a while we get something like “not commercially useful…” quote. Some reviewers have no idea what commercial useful is. For example most of my tracks are “commercially useless”, some of them were rejected… then why I am making sells in extended licences every month? Not everyone needs only jingles and ukulele backgrounds.
Well said….and if they new what was commercial, why do more than half of my accepted tracks have no sales? Okay, so I just dissed myself big time.

I think half of everyone’s portfolio has no sales. ;)

359 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 2 years
  • Has referred 1+ members
  • Has sold $100+ on Envato Market
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
+1 more
adammonroe says

That’s interesting,but,i don’t think creativity matters a lot in this business,when i produce royalty free music i always see it as a grind and i don’t need much creativity because most of the times i produce music that i don’t really like but the music that i think that will sell. Tried making music i like,didn’t work :P

Too true.

359 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 2 years
  • Has referred 1+ members
  • Has sold $100+ on Envato Market
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
+1 more
adammonroe says

You really want to subject the world to my singing. Well alright, challenge accepted.

359 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 2 years
  • Has referred 1+ members
  • Has sold $100+ on Envato Market
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
+1 more
adammonroe says

Behringer Truth B2031a. Maybe one day I’ll upgrade, but so much of music production – from preamps to mics to monitors – is balancing increased $$$ with diminishing returns. Yes, this sounds better than that, but is it enough to justify the purchase, or does it just sound a little better? Already my cheapish monitors sound better than what 99.9% of people are going to be listening to a mix on. If we were all really smart, we’d mix using generic car speakers, television speakers, crap movie-theatre spearks, and iphone earbuds to get a sense of what the mix is REALLY going to end up sounding like. :-)

359 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 2 years
  • Has referred 1+ members
  • Has sold $100+ on Envato Market
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
+1 more
adammonroe says

I guess we were all less popular than we thought.

359 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 2 years
  • Has referred 1+ members
  • Has sold $100+ on Envato Market
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
+1 more
adammonroe says

Their stuff is pretty good, but expensive. They have BUNDLES now (sort of miffed on that one, as I spent a ton of money to buy stuff individually right before the bundles came out.)

I guess it depends on what you are trying to write? I’d recommend the BML stuff over the Sable stuff for orchestral work, but damn, the Sable stuff sounds good. Albion is still a pretty good value for coloring things.

If your serious about using the spitfire libraries, just make sure you have a fast enough computer with enough memory. I’ve got 32 gigs of RAM and a SSD and it is just barely covering it. For me, it’s worth it to not have to not EQ and mix a bunch of instruments and have things sound good (more-or-less) out of the box. It’s also worth it to me to pay the bit extra to not have to deal with ILOK DRM bullcrap (ala East West.)

Buying stuff from Spitfire isn’t the greatest. Not only do they not accept Paypal anymore but they take a day or two to process your credit card payment before they send you download links – at least they did for me.

Finally, a lot of the libraries don’t work like they do in their videos. All the BML Mural String libraries no longer have master patches with all the articulations and keyswitches, so if your used to keyswitching, fugitaboutit. Some of the BML libraries are lacking, in terms of things like you need to buy BML Mural vol 2 to get tremolo patches for all the strings (what?) the Trombone library doesn’t have a solo patch, just a2 (What?) the horn library doesn’t have an a4 patch just a2 (what?) ect…hopefully they release other volumes in the future for these kind of things.

359 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 2 years
  • Has referred 1+ members
  • Has sold $100+ on Envato Market
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
+1 more
adammonroe says

Usually I don’t use a sample library, I will use the string/brass patches on my Yamaha Keyboard. They sound like crap, but when you need to play strings and brass across the full range, they do the trick.

VSL has a nice “all” string patch, but really, If I’m loading patches it’s probably time to start breaking it down into the individual instrument sections.

359 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 2 years
  • Has referred 1+ members
  • Has sold $100+ on Envato Market
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
+1 more
adammonroe says

Seriously guys? Desktop>laptops. If you are doing any kind of music production that’s more than just a few tracks you are probably going to need multiple hard drives to store your samples, large amounts of RAM, a decently fast processor, an SSD drive, preamps…the only advantage a laptop really has is that it is portable, but really, so is a desktop. If desktops weren’t portable, LAN parties wouldn’t exist. For me, I have a half a rack of preamps, audio interfaces, analog equipment, microphones…if I’m going somewhere, that stuff is probably coming too, so at that point what does it matter if my computer is in a tower or folds in half?

I know society is in love with portable devices at the moment, but if you are doing any kind of serious work on computer from 3d modeling, to music production, to programming, to graphic design, it really pays to have a desktop. I’ve always thought Laptops were more for failed writers so they can take them to coffee shops and show off to the world that they are writing and students so they can take them to class and play video games, but hey, if people actually like Laptops, who am I to judge. :-)

359 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 2 years
  • Has referred 1+ members
  • Has sold $100+ on Envato Market
  • Has collected 1+ items on Envato Market
+1 more
adammonroe says

I think once you learn how to use one DAW, most of them are set up the same. Sure, they have their own little quirks but it’s all just a bunch of tracks laid out vertically that you route analog and midi inputs into/out and where you can lay DSP effects and Virtual Instruments/Plugins (like EzDrummer).

Reaper is pretty good as far as DSP processing and, although it isn’t free, you can sort of use it like it’s free?

Logic and Garage band are fine, but I’m not really partial to the GUI, like a lot of MAC stuff it feels cutesy to me. Garage Band makes it unnecessarily difficult to use 3rd Party plugins, but once you know how to do it it’s not so bad.

Protools on a MAC – Good for recording, but uses it’s own proprietary plugin format that no other DAWS use and that less people develop for.

FL studio I personally don’t like as an all-around DAW.

Cakewalk Sonar is what I use, mostly because it was the first DAW I used, so the setup is really familiar to me. I can personally attest to – having programmed some VST’s and tested them in different DAWS – that Sonar is pretty good/better at handling plugin-crashes and weird stuff than the aforementioned DAWS. But I doubt that’s an issue with EzDrummer, they have likely tested it in everything.

Steinberg’s Cubase I’ve barely used, but it seems pretty much like the “standard DAW.” Steinberg is also the company that developed VST – if you are using Windows, EZDRUMMER will undoubtedly be a VST Plugin. On Mac, you will likely use it as an AudioUnit plugin, which works with Garage Band, Logic, Digital Performer, ect. If you want to use Protools, you will be using AAX/RTAS, which again, is something only Protools uses.

If I were you, I’d go to the EZdrummer website (since that’s what you are using) and look at the list of compatible/supported hosts, and choose one that supports drag/drop as this is the easiest way to get the midi drum tracks from EzDrummer into a DAW.

I’m going to go out on a limb and say most people who will recommend DAWS are probably recommending the one they’ve used forever. I doubt most people have done a lot of comparisons between different DAWS, because once you get used to one, it’s pretty hard to switch and there’s little reason to.

If I were to live life over again, knowing what I know now, I’d probably give Cubase a shot, just for the fact that it is so closely tied to VST. But hey, you can download Reaper right now and try it for free. Hell, I mostly use Sonar but sometimes I’ll switch to Reaper just to do some DSP stuff.

There is no best DAW, it mostly comes down to if you feel comfortable using it and if you need the features offered. From a programming perspective, they all do pretty much the same thing. Route midi events and data, midi events trigger back samples, or analog inputs record samples, everything gets turned into floating point (or double floating point) numbers that are processed and mixed down into left and right channels.

by
by
by
by
by
by