Posts by TortoiseTree

671 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 3 years
  • Has referred 1+ members
  • Located in Australia
  • Has sold $10,000+ on Envato Market
+3 more
TortoiseTree
says

Even though I am an advocate for the belief that “release day/time isn’t that important” I must say I have seen it’s correlation with corporate tracks and to an extent with (some) cinematic tracks.

Historically, Sunday releases (US time) have been ok for me though as they keep your track around the middle of the front page for corporate/motivational once monday hits. Therefore it’s still within the range of the client before they get “search fatigue”. The one that hits hard is a friday release, those will really bury the track into the next page.

As for other genres I really don’t think it’s that important and in most categories your track can stay in the front in the long time and to be honest, the clients will look for specifically what they want anyway. It really is corporate motivational tracks where I think clients come in with something general in mind and then can normally find it within the first 20 listens…

671 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 3 years
  • Has referred 1+ members
  • Located in Australia
  • Has sold $10,000+ on Envato Market
+3 more
TortoiseTree
says

Well done guys. I was actually getting used to the 12 day thing and really not minding it at all. It really allowed me space to space out my uploads as I have been composing in spurts recently!

I have always wondered though, if this is a full-time job for them. Last summer when the review period went down to 2-3 days (there was one day i even got an approval 24 hours later) I thought there really wasn’t enough for them to do for it to constitute a full-time salary. Now that the volume of tracks is so large (7 reviewers now right?) doing 3000 tracks a month (that’s not even counting the rejected tracks) I’m sure it must be full time job now.

671 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 3 years
  • Has referred 1+ members
  • Located in Australia
  • Has sold $10,000+ on Envato Market
+3 more
TortoiseTree
says

Sam, thanks so much for starting this thread! You are a true gentleman!

Also, thanks so much to everyone who posted congratulations, it’s truly an honour to hear from such distinguished and successful authors!

Keep up the great work guys!

671 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 3 years
  • Has referred 1+ members
  • Located in Australia
  • Has sold $10,000+ on Envato Market
+3 more
TortoiseTree
says

Antonio, did you just get dark?

Yeah, just got my black paw!! I was about to celebrate it with everyone but I ended up going out the weekend and just got back…

I might post a thread…

671 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 3 years
  • Has referred 1+ members
  • Located in Australia
  • Has sold $10,000+ on Envato Market
+3 more
TortoiseTree
says


2.) Spreading submissions is good but for reasons that are not too obvious. Lots of authors here will mention front page exposure, but the more senior ones will tell you it’s not that important. The main reason it’s just not a good idea to bunch your submissions together is if they are in the same genre. If they are, they will appear next to each other when the clients click on genre, and the problem is s/he’ll see your logo and if they don’t like your first track(s) they will skip through the rest to the next author.

Imagine going to a buffet, and you try one beef dish you don’t like, then try another then you think to yourself “mmm, this place just doesn’t do beef well” and then you spend the day eating chicken dishes instead… same mentality goes for AudioJungle…
I can confirm this! Since I don’t upload something every three days anymore but only about once a week, my sales almost exploded! Maybe there’s another reason too, but I think TortoiseTree is right!

That’s great to know Matt! I think what it really is, is that you have developed a customer base and now clients go “Oh look, it’s a Matt Steiner piece I’ll probably buy that!” of course I also agree that the spacing helps as you get more of that “rarity appeal”.

Back to my buffet analogies… if you ate lobster every day, it wouldn’t be so special, right?

671 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 3 years
  • Has referred 1+ members
  • Located in Australia
  • Has sold $10,000+ on Envato Market
+3 more
TortoiseTree
says

Thanks for the tips! You actually reminded me of two questions I’ve had in mind:

1. I’ve always been into alternative/pop-punk like Anberlin, Yellowcard, Green Day, etc…. think there’s some viability for music like that on here? (Hope I’m not breaking any rules, but here’s my first music video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PYdVCNUiQso)

2. A buddy and I were talking about the regularity/spread of submissions. Would a submission, say once a week or so help to get more exposure? Is this because monitor the newly released stuff?

1.) Definitely! If you can bring it with the same quality and feel those guys do there will definitely be a customer for it. Remember, lots of the people that come to buy here like the same music as you do, but can’t use that music for their project as it’s too expensive or they don’t know how to license it. If you can bring them that feel and they can buy it here, they will!

2.) Spreading submissions is good but for reasons that are not too obvious. Lots of authors here will mention front page exposure, but the more senior ones will tell you it’s not that important. The main reason it’s just not a good idea to bunch your submissions together is if they are in the same genre. If they are, they will appear next to each other when the clients click on genre, and the problem is s/he’ll see your logo and if they don’t like your first track(s) they will skip through the rest to the next author.

Imagine going to a buffet, and you try one beef dish you don’t like, then try another then you think to yourself “mmm, this place just doesn’t do beef well” and then you spend the day eating chicken dishes instead… same mentality goes for AudioJungle…

671 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 3 years
  • Has referred 1+ members
  • Located in Australia
  • Has sold $10,000+ on Envato Market
+3 more
TortoiseTree
says

As a brand spankin newbie I’ve wondered about this, if I missed the boat so to speak. However, I would think audiojungle is only a piece of the whole machine. There are things like YouTube, Facebook, and many other means of promotion, including non-web, that help get you and your music noticed. No press is bad press if your tunes are good right? In the end it’s about branding and marketing yourself/studio/music versus simply uploading and waiting for a check. Thoughts?

You haven’t missed the boat, in terms of AudioJungle and in terms of your music career you definitely haven’t. Thing is, it is a little harder to break through now, but not impossible. Some authors have done very well here over a very brief period, and a lot of it depends on what your current portfolio looks like.

If you have a large, varied and strong portfolio and spread out your submissions, you can definitely still make a mark here. If you are “composing for audiojungle” then it’s a little bit of a different story, but to be honest, as long as your songs are good and you manage to create a customer base, you should be fine!

Oh, as a piece of advice, if you have a niche style of music you know you are pretty good at capitalise on that. I see a lot of authors who come here thinking they can hop on the “corporate/motivational” bandwagon thinking it’s easy then find that they don’t get dozens of sales for each song. That genre has become very competitive, so my best advice is do what you do best. It’s also more likely to score you extended licenses in the long run.

671 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 3 years
  • Has referred 1+ members
  • Located in Australia
  • Has sold $10,000+ on Envato Market
+3 more
TortoiseTree
says


Sales almost came to a halt. Don’t know if it’s the bundle or price increase :(

It’s good to hear your perspective on this soundengine since you probably maintain a decent number of sales a day. So any time sales halt for you it probably indicates something happening in the market to account for it.

I still have a hard time thinking that both the corporate bundle and price change (which is less than 24 hours old so there really isn’t enough time to judge its effect) would make such a significant dent in overall audiojungle sales.

It will be interesting next week, when the corporate bundle ends, to see what will happen. Also after the price change has had some time to see if that does anything. As envato has said, their prices are still well below most RF Library sites so ultimately it doesn’t seem like it would drive away customers in any great numbers.

Mmmm Yes. Next week will be interesting. To be honest, even though I applauded the price change like everyone else a certain amount of fear and doubt did enter my heart. I am worried that perhaps the volume of sales may go down and the ones that will get hit the hardest will be the the mid-low ranking authors (red paw and below… maybe even black paws) as they do not yet have the customer base of the top authors.

As a mid-ranking author (red paw) I am pretty worried…

671 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 3 years
  • Has referred 1+ members
  • Located in Australia
  • Has sold $10,000+ on Envato Market
+3 more
TortoiseTree
says

I believe Spring Break was March for most US students this year.

Oh yeah, my bad. Thanks. Gosh, I’ve been gone 4 months and I’m beginning to forget everything…

671 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 3 years
  • Has referred 1+ members
  • Located in Australia
  • Has sold $10,000+ on Envato Market
+3 more
TortoiseTree
says

Isn’t it spring break/midterms in the US right now? Even though students aren’t all of our clients I do think they represent a certain percentage.

I remember this week last year was pretty slow too. (Mid-April)

by
by
by
by
by
by