Posts by TortoiseTree

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TortoiseTree says

Hey guys, I’ve been doing powerpoint presentations from scratch for years now and just realised you can sell them here. I’ve noticed that in most of these files the images (jpeg) ARE included (unlike the WordPress themes in Themeforest where they’re not included). So can I buy PhotoDune images to use for a powerpoint template? Also I assume I’d need to buy an extended license as I am making a product which I will then be selling again.

Thanks

600 posts
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TortoiseTree says

When I think of Hollywood sounding scores, woodwinds that have that “big Hollywood sound” don’t really come to mind, you know? Maybe partly because modern Hollywood scores no longer use woodwinds :-) But they don’t sound that bad in the demos…

+1 It is interesting to see how the flute/oboe/clarinet fell out of favour for film scores. I sometimes watch movies from before the 80’s and see the woodwinds playing a strong roll (especially in British films LOL) but less and less as the years go by.

Mind you, one film score I really liked that did use quite a bit of woodwind was the one for the two new Star Treks. Whilst the main melody is played by horns, the woodwind theme backing it up is also pretty sweet.

600 posts
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TortoiseTree says

Gotta agree with Adam. You gotta be really wary of how seductive these programs are, especially the YouTube “features” where they show the program’s capacity. I’m also running out of a MacBook Pro and I soon learned how thirsty a lot of these programs are.

Taking a page out of the lessons learned from the video that Matt (AlumoAudio) uploaded about that Swedish production duo:

Try your best with your current setup and see where you go with it. Buy slowly here and there, programs you really like and you know will really add flavour.

Mind you though, IF you do have the hardware to take it, EW is pretty sweet and the deal is pretty good from an economic standpoint. I have a colleague who is fiercely loyal to EW and did amazing things with it, although she did have a pretty damn good hardware setup to back it up.

600 posts
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TortoiseTree says

Thanks so much for the great advice guys.

I watch a thing or two on YouTube.

I personally really like everything from this guy’s channel (I’m sure tons of you know this guy’s work):

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjRzsiP_aDWWLHV4-2LKBtg
600 posts
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TortoiseTree says

Hey guys,

I’ve been really wanting to improve a lot of different elements of my songwriting/production. Any recommendations as to great books/videos about production to give new ideas?

This will be a nice thread to share creative resources for all of us!

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TortoiseTree says

That’s really good advice – I don’t do that and I should.

Thanks!

No problem! I’m glad you liked the advice.

Yeah, it’s a bit of work, you’d be surprised how long it takes to put 2 links on each page. Like everything else here it’s a labour of love and pays off in the long run so it’s all good. It’s also a really good chance to reinforce your brand/style. You have that teal, black and white colour thing going and I think it’s a great and solid colour trio. You could make your links those colours too!

I like your new logo a lot too! It’s really nice!

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TortoiseTree says

I’d first edit stuff on your own site before reaching out outside of the envato world. It’s so useful just having a link or two of “Hey you like this genre? I have similar stuff!” on every page. You have to remember that most of the time people are here it’s because they have a project that’s nearly done and they just need that track that has just the right feel to it. If they’re already on one of your tracks chances are you’re already close to what they want. Giving them other similar options might just seal the deal instead of them jumping to pages that aren’t yours.

At the same time it’s important not to go overboard with this. I see authors with like 40 links in each page and that’s pretty ineffective as most are unrelated. For example, let’s say you have dubstep track with vocals. Put a link to your other dubstep work and one to your other vocal work and that should be good enough. Chances are they weren’t looking for a reggae track if they were on that song so don’t include a link to your reggae music!

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TortoiseTree says

I completely agree that it sometimes beggars belief that these producers we see, seemingly with pockets brimming with cash, are generating their income solely from a bunch of album sales in a niche sector of the music market.

However, the reality is much different and it would also be wrong to say that they just earn the most of their crust from doing commercials. Having worked in the dance music industry myself as an active producer, DJ and performer for many years up until around 2007, I can say there are many other income streams available. In the case of Minilogue for example, most of their earnings would be generated from live ticket sales and live performance royalties, as they’re pretty much in high demand for what they do. ‘Live PA’ and DJ sets can earn fantastic amounts alone. And remember, guys like this will perform worldwide in large festivals and shows, that generate big figures.

Also, you’re correct about ghost writing, although within the electronic/EDM genre especially, remixing other artists (and very famous artists at that) make up a very large part of earnings. And on top of this, there is track licensing for music complication CDs, vinyl sales, digital sales via BeatPort, iTunes, etc. And then of course there are normal royalties for radio and TV placements.

Also, many artists do indeed get commissioned by plugin manufacturers and sound libraries to create soundsets, and act as an endorsement for their products. Again, another income stream. The list goes on and it really does all add up.

Ben Lukas Boysen is an anomaly in this really, as alongside being a DJ and producer, he’s built a name for himself in the world for creating bespoke work for commercials. But this rarely applies in most cases. If anything, the majority of professional artists will get their work licensed out on commercials via their publishers, without them even knowing about it in some cases (similar to the RF music market in that respect).

Anyhow, hope that offers a little insight, and apologies to Flossie for taking this thread wildly off-topic! :)

Matt, thanks so much for your expert insight!! Also it’s great to know I’m not the only one thinking “Where does all this come from?”.

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TortoiseTree says

Great videos Matt, thanks a lot!

A little thought/question for those of you who know a lot behind the business of music…

Ok, so watching these videos and a lot of the proppellerhead, native instruments ones a certain thing comes to mind. When you watch all these producer “features” where they show you their house, their gear, their lifestyle etc. one can’t help but think “this is all rather luxurious isn’t it?”.

Now it’s rather hard to proceed towards my next point without offending anyone but I think it’s something a few of us wonder…

Where does all the money come from? In the case of Ben Lucas Boysen you do see him doing a commercial for Mazda and I checked out his website and he does a LOT of commercials so I’m not too surprised he’s minted. But in some of these producer features for proppelerhead and NI you see this guys with fancy apartments in midtown Manhattan or London or Stockholm so they must really be raking it in. Now I do comprehend that maybe some of them are really big in a genre I don’t know, or maybe in their country but some of these places I’ve seen (and I know quite a lot about real estate) are worth a pretty penny and I find it hard to imagine it’s easy to afford these places when you’re not producing a major artist or doing ads for big companies.

So here is my question, the majority of the money these musicians make comes from doing commercials right? My jingle writing teacher in university was loaded so I can imagine that that’s how they are affording all this. Or perhaps ghost producing/writing. I dunno, I just find it hard to believe that album sales in “alternative” music fields yield that much… Just so you know I am referring to NI videos mostly, I’m guessing this Swedish duo are doing a lot of producing for others.

Ok, you can look at some of the top authors sales figures here and to be honest they seem to make more than a lot of people in the corporate world (heck look at the ThemeForest elite… they seem to make more than some CEO’s)

I’d love the insight and I think everyone else here is also interested.

As a side note Canon and Nikon are also incredibly guilty of these types of “features” and commercials. You watch their ads and you think photographers are millionaires and lead fantastic lives. Apple and Samsung do this too…. This is another theory I had though, maybe Ableton, NI and all them lot want to make it look like the producers have a great lifestyle so you buy their product.

This parody outlines my point perfectly:

http://www.collegehumor.com/video/6905817/every-tech-commercial
600 posts
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TortoiseTree says

I used to have very similar viewpoint, especially coming from the realms of dnb production back in the late 90s. But I’ve discovered there are indeed highly creative Dubstep producers out there that just don’t get the same limelight that the more mainstream Skrillexes of the world seem to get.

I highly recommend checking this guy below.

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Thanks for the fantastic post, Matt. It’s really great seeing what it takes be successful in the industry. The level of detail and hard work this guy puts is amazing and just seeing how hard he works to get where he is really puts things in perspective.

Would you (or anyone) have links to more videos where you can get an insight into top producer’s work style/ethic?

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