Posts by Lmz

35 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 3 years
  • Has sold $10,000+ on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Had an item featured on Envato Market
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Lmz says

With audience size, the licensing is better able to reconcile these market differences between Broadcast for large or metropolitan areas compared to smaller or less populated regions of similar geographical nature (e.g. New York City vs. Omaha, Nebraska, or even Denmark vs. the entire USA for example). Finally, as we continue to see more and more online substitutions for traditional broadcast, geographical boundaries become less and less relevant.

Yes, there are extreme population differences across different regions of the world, which is why broadcasters use territorial boundaries/regions for their markets. It really doesn’t matter the number of people who hear/see the content. The intention is that it is either for local/national/worldwide promotion. This about traditional broadcasting only.

Of course the internet complicates this and needs to be treated differently for a multitude of reasons (like not needing to run a costly network tv/radio channel just to get content out). You can’t treat the internet like traditional broadcasting in licensing terms, and the opposite is also true.

I can understand the need to have a small number of forward thinking licensing options to cover any potential type of music use for convenience. It just seems that boiling many types of use into a couple licenses is going to raise more questions of ‘what license do I need’, especially when the terms of it aren’t standard to how something as specific as broadcast licensing works. By trying to be ahead of the curve for music licensing, it feels like it isn’t relevant to the way these things (traditional broadcasting) work, and licensing is all about being relevant.

You guys have obviously put a lot of thought into this and feel it’ll work well. I look forward to the new changes and hope that’ll all work out well regardless.

I do have one question regarding audience size, is the number mentioned meant to be per broadcast or cumlutive of each airing? Example: A radio ad plays with an AJ track in the background reaches roughly 500,000 people a day and airs for a month. Does radio ad production pay for a license to cover the 500,000 per broadcast or the total amount of people at the end of it’s run cycle?

35 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 3 years
  • Has sold $10,000+ on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Had an item featured on Envato Market
+1 more
Lmz says

Nice to see AJ tweaking things in hopes of making things better.

I’m not so sure that ‘audience size’ is a great measure for licensing. Doesn’t seem enforceable at all, realistically. The person licensing the track will probably have zero control over how many people view their content, and of course they would want everyone in the world to see their content for maximum exposure. I imagine that folks using this sort of licensing measure probably won’t be counting up their audience size and then remember to go upgrade their license when appropriate. I know I wouldn’t!

Say someone online (where audience size is easily trackable, unlike non-internet broadcast streams that use approximate numbers) does exceed their audience size for their license, how is the licensing enforced? Will their content be taken from a request until a proper license has been sorted? Will their be a penalty for people who ignore their licensing terms? If it’s a tv show will the episode be pulled from the air? If I was a customer, I wouldn’t like having those as potential hazards because of a music track that I paid for who knows how long ago. However, as an Author, I would want those things to happen because otherwise the licensing terms are useless.

A suggestion, replace audience size with a system based on territory. Break things up into local/national/worldwide. This would work well for non-internet related broadcast use. It’s like audience size but not dependant on the number of people that view it, just potential numbers. This feels a bit more concrete to me if I were someone looking to purchase music for this sort of broadcast type since I can’t control, or really accurately keep track of, my audience size.

For internet use (which is inherently a bit tricker), you could set things up per site(s). If it’s a youtube video only, offer a one site only license and have the website listed in the licensing terms. Then a multiple site license, followed by unlimited. For single and multiple website licenses, the license should contain the websites the content will be used, which the user would provide at the time of purchase. With a multiple license, they could potentially update those website until they exceed the number sites allowed.

These licensing ideas should be allowed to be combined as separate licenses (maybe with a small discount for multi-use licenses), or perhaps combine them together in general (local broadcast with a one website, national with multi site, worldwide with unlimited sites).

This would also be difficult to enforce (music licensing is in general) but it might be a bit clearer to the buyer how they can use the track, making it less likely they’ll pay for the cheapest one and do whatever they want with it. If the internet licenses contained the websites intended, that would be easily enforceable, though the buyer may not know every site they’ll be posting it at the time of purchase.

This doesn’t address how music should work in a project where someone is re-selling it as part of a larger whole but that seems to something AJ had figured out under their old (current) licensing system, so I’m sure they can sort that out fine.

Anyways, my 2 cents!

35 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 3 years
  • Has sold $10,000+ on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Had an item featured on Envato Market
+1 more
Lmz says

Yep!

35 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 3 years
  • Has sold $10,000+ on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Had an item featured on Envato Market
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Lmz says

Audiojungle itself is a marketplace, not a music production company. It provides an opportunity to sell music and that’s it.

As much as it sucks to have things rejected for no given reason, it’s really not the role of a marketplace to tell their producers how to fix their products/content. Fortunately, the forums have proven to a great place to get feedback in these situations. You’d get way more detailed feedback here, which seems to be what people are asking for in the first place. Having feedback posted in the forum also allows others to learn from those mistakes and how to fix them.

35 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 3 years
  • Has sold $10,000+ on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Had an item featured on Envato Market
+1 more
Lmz says

...When you pass by people’s portfolios you see amazing credits like “music featured on BBC, ABC and CBS”...

This might be related to music they have registered with a Performing Rights Organization (PRO). PRO’s will send out quarterly statements to the composer containing the ‘who, what, when, where’ of their music use. This would be for non-royalty free music. The whole job of a PRO is to find out that information, collect royalties on that, and then pay them out to the appropriate people.

Of course, it also could be music from AJ but that’s a bit harder to track down. You might be able to use TuneSat to find that information out but that company is really more for finding royalty-based music that wasn’t reported to a PRO. Some composers could find a lot of missing revenue that way.

35 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 3 years
  • Has sold $10,000+ on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Had an item featured on Envato Market
+1 more
Lmz says

Coffee Snob? Only a little…

I roast, grind, and brew my own coffee at home. Preferred brewer of choice, Hario v60 ceramic drip cone. Other options would be a Melitta pour over and a Chemex (I think I still have a regular drip somewhere as well). I also have a Gaggia espresso machine for those moments when you’ve got to have a shot.

So only a little.

35 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 3 years
  • Has sold $10,000+ on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Had an item featured on Envato Market
+1 more
Lmz says

DMG’s EQuilibrium – An amazingly clean eq with customizable digital curves (applicable per band) based on vintage eq’s and filters. Tons of sound shaping options in one plugin. A little expensive for an EQ but it’s been worth it.

http://dmgaudio.com/products_equilibrium.php
35 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 3 years
  • Has sold $10,000+ on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Had an item featured on Envato Market
+1 more
Lmz says

Get in touch with the uploader of the video and ask that they add a link to the beginning of their description where they can purchase the song. That’ll give you another video out there with the potential to lead to a sale.

If they decide not to, then ask for the video to be removed if you feel that it is harmful to your business. Not sure if youtube would do that but you could always mention the threat. Although, I imagine that the person(s) who posted the video would be more than happy to help promote the artist they like so much.

Side-note, it would help if there were a ‘personal’ license option for AJ so those wanting to get the track could do so without paying for a license that won’t ever fully use. Otherwise, those who like the music on AJ will continue to find other ways of obtaining it.

35 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 3 years
  • Has sold $10,000+ on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Had an item featured on Envato Market
+1 more
Lmz says

From my understanding, commercials are (generally) created by an ad agency (or video production service) for a company wanting an advertisement. The company hires them to deliver a completed spot, or ‘work’, (including the proper license for the music used) to be broadcast on tv/radio.

So that being the case, music used in an ad (bought be the ad agency/ video service) is being sold as part of a finished product to the company so an extended license would be needed.

From the terms of the regular license: “You are licensed to use the Item to create one single End Product for yourself or for one client (a “single application”), and the End Product can be distributed for Free.

Thanks for the clarification!

35 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 3 years
  • Has sold $10,000+ on Envato Market
  • Sells items exclusively on Envato Market
  • Had an item featured on Envato Market
+1 more
Lmz says

The answer is in the question, commercials are free to watch, so no extended license is required for a commercial.

From my understanding, commercials are (generally) created by an ad agency (or video production service) for a company wanting an advertisement. The company hires them to deliver a completed spot, or ‘work’, (including the proper license for the music used) to be broadcast on tv/radio.

So that being the case, music used in an ad (bought be the ad agency/ video service) is being sold as part of a finished product to the company so an extended license would be needed.

If the company is producing the spot itself then a regular license would work (I think) since the created spot wouldn’t ever be ‘sold’ for profit.

Or maybe I’m missing something?

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