Posts by Draqo

13 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has sold $100+ on Envato Market
Draqo says

I love more knowledge. _

There is also the digital factor that no matter how sensitive or bit-depth, it will never reach absolute precision. This is the same reason why vinyl is the closest thing to near perfect. So in attempt to blow my mind, let me blow yours… ;)

When we had 16 color screens, we would use different combinations to make a new color, and zoom out so that it blends as a solid color in our perception. (GIF Encoding does the same thing with dithering.) Now, when we had 8-bit MIDI synths, we would blend two different combinations to make a new tone, and then speed it up (higher octave) to blend as a solid tone. Now if you continue this process all the way up to today’s technology, we’re doing the exact same concept on a never-ending struggle to increase quality. Effects and samples are processed at lower octaves first, DAW ’s and studios take over with algorithms to clean every curve while blending with the next sample. This is the same concept of zooming-in and adding a new pixel color, then on the final product it is zoomed out. Though in real time this takes less than a second.

Still, no matter how high the sample rate, it can only come within 99.99% absolute precision. Same reasoning behind that we can only get to 99.99% of absolute zero temperature, 99.99% color depth, and why 1/INF is theoretical 0, and 1 – 1/INF is 99.99%. Our bounds are between 0 and 1, never equaling. :)

13 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has sold $100+ on Envato Market
Draqo says

Another long type…

When you have high-polyphony instruments being layered all at once, the speakers must cope with the output. This can sometimes lead to music sounding like it’s full volume and in ranges where it shouldn’t.

When it gets really bad, on an EQ display it will show ranges being amplified as a result for compensation. (This is even so at 44.1KHz-48KHz sampling rate.)

So at a certain point, your audio system starts telling you that there’s too many samples/variations and ends up bleeding over (response time/vibration factor.) Beyond that, the computer itself is indicating too many samples/variations at once.

Generic 2.1 speakers systems have the most problems being designed to send frequencies to 2 individual parts (the satellites, and the sub) without intelligently splitting it up. So you technically have 2 audio systems, both playing the same tune, but different specifics. For example, why would you need to hear a sub-bass tune being played through the satellites when it was specifically designed for the subwoofer? Now add a instrument like a violin and play almost the same tune the bass is, it gets worse. And this is what I call a bleed.

Now, when using headphones and 2.0 audio systems, deep bass is gone yet its ghost still remains on the higher ranges, and sometimes drowning the song.

With higher-quality audio systems like a Logitec X240 or even BOSE C3 2 .1 sounds are better self-EQ’ed and in the proper audible ranges. This is thanks to lower response times and better vibration management (magnets are magnets and obey to Newton’s law of motion.)

I hope that explains what I’m trying to point out.

(And there’s a typo in my first post, instead of “20Hz and above,” it should be “20KHz” and above.)

13 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has sold $100+ on Envato Market
Draqo says

There’s enough epix in this place to power a small town, not a real town mind you, but a tiny termite mound who has passed a series of energy conservation acts and enforced heavily and punishable by death in the event of the new laws being violated. In doing so, the rebel crickets are getting anxious and ready to invade the little pansies and run the joint.

LIVE FORUMS LIVE !

13 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has sold $100+ on Envato Market
Draqo says

It can be used to flex any author’s e-strife, but instead of using sale counts how about popularity points? That way no one knows how much you have sold only that you are well known and a quality producer. These would be accumulated by how many hits and sampling (as well as sales in some degree) of items.

Showing of one’s ammount of sales and wealth to the public view is a little cringy. However, it does help the little guys out in getting the wealth. So I recommend only showing sales for Maestro so I can get some of the wealth. XD

13 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has sold $100+ on Envato Market
Draqo says

I’ll get right on that… :p

But I agree, few will upload the cream of their music as source files because parting with it. Knowing someone else will be able to manipulate it easier than you can after having spending hours as Maestro said is, for some, a difficult concept.

13 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has sold $100+ on Envato Market
Draqo says

Now, I have stumbled across a sheet music with the organizer and songwriter names on the piece. William H. Keith. Jr. who is the song writer and music written by Nina Barton. This comes from the none other than BattleTech magazine issue 0101. Now, the song itself is copyrighted by the authors, but what about the tune? BattleTech fandome runs deep in my veins and because of that I love the tune, and with having the resources to reconstruct it I wish to share it themed to my style yet keeping the baseline tune.

So that is my dilemma. I have successfully done things similar with a tune from the soundtrack of MechWarrior 2 while it’s not exact people who love the games will recognize with joy that it came from it. The end result being PC Episode 5. (Though I am fearful of uploading it due to the same reason.)

The real question is how much can it be changed before it becomes an entirely new version created by another author and then sold? Not so much as a remix but a complete reconstruction?

13 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has sold $100+ on Envato Market
Draqo says

This tutorial is targeted to beginning producers (that are musicians :p) that wish to take themselves from simple garage bands, soloists, singers, pianists, etc to the next level…into the fake…errr…”enhanced” world of software studios.

Step 1: Choosing an operating system and studio base. Mac or Windows?

Some of the top digital software studios are proprietary based and will be the sole factor of the availability of resources.

Tip 1: Logic Pro (Mac) is the industry standard….right….sure…..so is Cubase, Reason, and all the others who claim this notion. A host is a host, a MIDI tracker can do as much (though requiring more work) as a top of the line studio can do. It comes down to the person in front of the keyboard and to that is available. Logic is indeed a juice production studio with lots of features and extras but without those it’s just a host which every production studio strives to be for 3rd party resources and compatibility.

Tip 2: FruityLoops sounds corny, but is simple enough to understand and great for beginners and even professionals as a host for DAW ’s. (Yes I use it so shush.) However, it’s not 64-bit compliant (yet) which is a downer for high-end libraries.

Step 2: Choosing Base of Resources. Rich or Poor? Seriously…

Now not all can afford Vienna (the holy 1 terabyte library of deliciousness) but some may can, and if having the money why not? Though in doing so will make the computer costs increase dramatically. And will there be external hardware? If so, the interfaces required will determine how to build a computer.

Tip 1: Never, ever, ever use presets that come with a computer or on software that come with the hardware. These included Garage Band (as a whole), MIDI tracking creation software, and mixing software. (still talking about actual presets.) Unless making games in the early 90’s for DOS these are the bottom of the producing food chain. Everyone has heard the tones, and unless it was a Korg M1 or Roland D50 emulation it is far from appealing.

Tip 2: Soundfonts are one step up from MIDI , one step down from DAW /VST’s. They are easy to use (and be downloaded from anywhere), and most host studio software will support them. However, much of them are GM which are in fact a MIDI library for budget keyboards. The GM soundfonts are ones to avoid.

Tip 3: EastWest Colossus/Goliath is one step down from the core DAW libraries but one step up from soundfonts. It’s a good start for being on a budget while not being a cheap bastard, though making yourself a cheap bastard in the eyes of experienced producers. Score negative one to zero. This is a basic high-end GM-like library for general purpose though still taking up several gigabytes of space.

Tip 4: Do you have the time to install over a dozen DVD ’s? This is an honest question. Until we finally push to blu-ray storage shipping or better yet we get a damn hard drive that already has them installed on it when buying libraries, they will be coming on DVD ’s and installing them takes forever and on a 2Mbs cable connection will take forever to download them. Shop for libraries carefully, and install carefully.

Step 3: Choosing or building one or few computers. Why more than one?

Depending on what OS chosen and resources being used it comes down to the computer that can handle those choices. Libraries in the gigabytes will require the system requirements it says on the box, no less. Even if it says 900GB (that’s right gigabytes) and another computer just for storage which is connected via 1Gb Ethernet to a computer to do the work. Some might laugh but for some this is a solution for massive libraries. Others on a budget can just stick to their simple computers and buy a sound card suited to the needs of external devices and audio quality. Be sure to get at least 2.1 non-generic speaker systems.

Tip 1: RAM is an issue for massive libraries, not so much for soundfonts and simple DAW ’s as 2GB will do. However, the speed is of great importance and I personally recommend a computer with at least a 2.2GHz (multi-core) CPU and 800Mhz FSB . This is in partly for rendering songs, as high quality outputs take a long time.

Tip 2: Graphic cards? Depends, screens increase productivity but there’s not much (or rather none) usefulness for audio by buying a graphic card. Though for analysis and pretty effects while editing it does take a load off the CPU for those studios that make use of the high-end GPU cards for editing and display purposes.

Tip 3: Fanless is a friend, so is living in Alaska, unfortunately not all of us can see Russia from our house, nor can a CPU live without a fan unless using a 10 pound heat sink (it’s beautiful and next on my building project.) Less the computer makes noise the better.

Gem Tip: Prodikeys (MIDI/PC Keyboard hybrid) developed by Creative is absolutely awesome but is not Vista or 64-bit compatible. Those without external sequencers/interfaces might want to invest $50 in this lovely tool.

Step 4: Cables, holy (bleep) cables!

Indeed there will be a lot of cables much of them are USB and audio jacks, others will be the traditional MIDI plugs which need to be converted into USB or plugged directly into the sound card interface cabling.

Tip 1: Make sure it’s plugged in, and into the right female. Really.

Tip 2: Prepare, amps plugged into a computer may make ears bleed.

Tip 3: USB Mic’s are only good as the computer that has no other USB devices active.

Tip 4: That’s not static in the background, that’s the noisy computer. Put it in another room, or cancel out the 8KHz+ range, (maybe both cause that works too.)

Step 5: Painting…wait…what?

Note painting is the core concept when making songs, just as if singing or playing an instrument, they all have lengths, tone, and velocities. The concept is expanded when making patterns as each one has a length, effect, and velocity. This is the same concept across all studio software and must be learned.

Tip 1: Arp’s (arpeggio) are great for those that are tone deaf and hate painting.

Tip 2: Randomizers have a law of statistics which share with that of success to that of a chimp. The song of pi sounds better than the outcomes of these algorithms.

Tip 3: Music theory is for study for the mind, producing is for creating by the ear. Do not get caught up into how it should sound on a piece of paper. With a studio it can be manipulated and violated in so many ways one sees fit.

This was a long type out, but I’m taking a break from remastering all my scrap work to upload and noticed how much I have changed over the past five years and what I have used. And thought I share my beginnings and tips for others.

13 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has sold $100+ on Envato Market
Draqo says

New inflated head?

13 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has sold $100+ on Envato Market
Draqo says

Lets see if this works…

01:07

Yup…BOW BEFORE ME MORTALS ! FOR I AM AWESOME …

Back to the topic, html escape codes do in fact work.

0 = ‘& # 4 8 ;’ (what’s inside the apostrophes, without the spaces)

13 posts
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
  • Has sold $100+ on Envato Market
Draqo says

There’s a very large difference between composing with headphones and a quality audio system. The lower frequency in the 60Hz and below range are cut off when using common $50 headphones and will sometimes bleed into the 100Hz and higher range to compensate. The same goes for the high quality $80 audio systems where the high end of 20Khz and above will bleed into the lower frequencies, but are not as much noticeable with headphones. So when composing with my Bose audio system and then listening through headphones my music sounds completely different because of how the speaker response operates. Though Bose audio systems are not a common household item to have, my headphones are which makes it difficult on how to compose and master between high and low quality outcomes.

Just remember, how it may sound on your system doesn’t mean it’ll sound the same on others. People using 2.0 speaker systems will not hear the bass, the common $40 2.1 speaker systems have a habit of bleeding ranges, the $80 ones have a habit ignoring high pitches, and Bose and other quality systems just like being themselves and process everything through as if it were in the theaters.

And to just solve all your problems, though not recommended, is to cut off the 60Hz and below and 20Hz and above ranges via a master EQ. There will still be bass, and the high pitches can still be heard well enough without cracking household audio systems.

Have fun. :D

by
by
by
by
by
by