Posts by CodingJack

5337 posts The Dude Abides
  • Located in United States
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
+9 more
CodingJack says

^ yes that’s a much better example.

5337 posts The Dude Abides
  • Located in United States
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
+9 more
CodingJack says

2. Past history of Envato on disabling item was brutal enough to arrive this conclusion.
3. There is no explanation about this scenario in the announcement (for a reason?)

It’s in the “Things we’re still figuring out” section:

Governance, dispute resolution, refund policies and processes to help operate the marketplace in a fair and friendly way

But this is really the million dollar question. And without this information, all Envato has done is strike fear into the mind of authors. Most authors aren’t going to have a problem following the guidelines. But no matter how great and timely our support is, no one is immune to the “customer from hell” that buys our items at least once a month (and for top authors, probably once a day). So when they report us to Envato, claiming we didn’t meet our support obligations, are we going to be automatically protected? Or will Envato have a “shut it down, ask questions later” approach as they do with all DMCA’s (likely what VF is referring to in his #2).

A clear action plan for this should be top priority. Because giving us 3 months to “prepare” is useless without this information. We need assurance that our livelihoods are going to be protected, and that as long as we follow the guidelines, under no circumstances will our items or accounts get disabled at any point, no matter what.

Personally I think this is why a central and public support forum, run by Envato, is crucial to making this work. This way Envato can just track response times automatically, and review specific “support not adequate” claims easily without having to go through the huge mess of evaluating an external forum or email conversation.

5337 posts The Dude Abides
  • Located in United States
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
+9 more
CodingJack says

From here: http://codecanyon.net/make_money/affiliate_program

When a new user clicks your referral link, signs up for an account and purchases an item (or deposits money) via any of the Envato Market sites, you will receive 30% of that person’s first cash deposit or purchase price. If they deposit $20 into their account, you get $6. If they buy a $200 item, you get $60.

So technically, if someone clicks a referral link and purchases an item from an elite author, Envato doesn’t make any money (70% of the sale goes to elite author, 30% of the sale goes to referral author). So if author rates were raised to 80%, Envato would technically lose money in the deal. 10% might not seem like a lot, but in the grand scheme of things, with all the people running referral sites and all the elite authors, it would probably add up to a substantial number.

Edit: Just realized I read your response wrong, and thought you said “how do you get referral income?” as opposed to “how often do you get referral income? Coffee has officially left my system for the day :D

5337 posts The Dude Abides
  • Located in United States
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
+9 more
CodingJack says

80% + 30% referral rate = 110% = not gunna happen :P

5337 posts The Dude Abides
  • Located in United States
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
+9 more
CodingJack says

I’m guessing most authors have experienced the following:

  • Customer writes a book with 10 questions all in pretty bullet points you’re now tasked with answering.
  • Customer responds, writes another book.
  • A week goes by, another new book to read, and you realize you’ve just had a 30 email conversation with the customer. Time to cut the cord…

Under the new rules, how would we handle something like this? Can we just refund the customer their purchase and be done with it? Because if we can’t ever free ourselves of these type of customers, it directly conflicts with the following objective from the blog announcement:

We want to make sure Authors still have time and energy to do what they do best — create great work for sale.

And here’s the tricky part—The customer wasn’t asking for custom work, and technically all their questions were completely reasonable. But if you don’t ever cut off communication, you’re going to end up having a 100 email conversation with them, which is completely unacceptable for an $18 sale.

5337 posts The Dude Abides
  • Located in United States
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
+9 more
CodingJack says

+1

5337 posts The Dude Abides
  • Located in United States
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
+9 more
CodingJack says

+1

The easiest way to streamline this would be to add an official “ChangeLog” tab to the item, that authors can populate, and then include a link to the official ChangeLog tag with the update notice.

5337 posts The Dude Abides
  • Located in United States
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
+9 more
CodingJack says

\\

lol no one cares about badges anymore :D

5337 posts The Dude Abides
  • Located in United States
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
+9 more
CodingJack says

1) Buy item with support (get all updates and can ask questions)

2) Buy item without support (get all updates but can’t ask questions)

I think the 6 month time limited support just confuses everyone.

+1 This is by far the best system. Anyone who thinks “support” is just answering general questions and fixing bugs obviously doesn’t provide it on a large scale. In reality, “support” = fixing other people’s problems.

Thoughts from this thread:

Official support forum is a must.
There has to be a unified way of verifying quality and quantity of support.
72 hour rule is a problem.
It needs to be “3 business days”. Otherwise, we’re talking about a scenario where no author can ever take a long weekend.

......

On a side note, I’m wondering if Envato should have taken a different approach. It’s not that hard to figure out if an author provides support or not. So why not just start rejecting items from authors who don’t provide support? And then to cover all bases, bury items in the search that don’t include support. Problem solved.
5337 posts The Dude Abides
  • Located in United States
  • Elite Author: Sold more than $75,000 on Envato Market
  • Has sold $125,000+ on Envato Market
  • Has been part of the Envato Community for over 5 years
+9 more
CodingJack says

What if author ask for access to WordPress dashboard to provide support and buyer rejected his request? Who is guilty in this situation?

Some guidelines are going to be needed for this. We could handle it like Apple does for jailbreakers:

“Mixing this plugin or theme with other plugins and themes voids your support warranty”.

Clear and simple, no need to ever login to their site. Otherwise, we’re just opening a huge can of worms.

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