Posts by PixelBuffet

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PixelBuffet says

I don’t think that would ever happen, they’re just looking into allowing us to choose whether we want to be 100% GPL or not. I can’t see Envato ever forcing it on authors.

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PixelBuffet says

Good question Caldazar.

Another one I’ve got is about pricing. Currently our themes (on a standard license) are pretty cheap compared to most theme shops, whilst an extended license would require me to re-mortgage my house to afford!

If I switch to 100% GPL and lose the extended license, should the cost of my theme raise – to reflect the new freedoms given to the end user?

If yes: It would make the split-license themes more desirable, as people would just purchase the cheaper one (I don’t think many end users give a crap about licensing).

If no: Keeping pricing as it is now though would make the extended license even more absurd. My 100% GPL $50 theme is actually now competing with your $2500 extended license theme (and even then, mine offers more freedom).

The more I think about it, the more I think I’d like to go 100% GPL – but there are a few things I’d like to see answered first.

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PixelBuffet says

We actually deal with “copycats” easily on WordPress.org…
Thanks for your insight Justin. I guess it’s not as complicated as I’d thought. Envato would have to draw a similar set of guidelines and be consistent with them.

This does still leave one aspect open though, which you guys don’t have to deal with on .org…

What do you think Envato should do if I took a design of a WP theme (100% GPL) and ported it to Drupal / Joomla. Would this be ok, so long as I kept the author credit in the CSS?

I can see a fair few authors not worrying about the copycats, or those who want something for nothing (as they’d pirate it anyway). I can, however, see them being very unhappy about their theme being sold by someone else on a different platform. Yet that would kind of be the point of extending the GPL to cover the CSS/images wouldn’t it? If it’s ok to do it with the code, should it be ok to do it with the design too?

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PixelBuffet says

“[...] it is not the product itself that carries value. The value lies in the intellectual and/or creative work that went into the product. [...] What you have to sell [...] is the creativity and skill behind the code.” You see? Copies of your software aren’t rare so they don’t have any monetary value. Your skills and your understanding of your software are the rare goods here. That pretty much sums up the whole philosophy.

...but this is just a shop selling digital goods.

People like WooThemes have had to adapt to going 100% GPL, You can get all their themes elsewhere for $15. They are now basically selling updates and support for a theme (for a year).

How can Envato do that? They can review themes (i.e. the product itself) to make sure it’s good enough for their (and our) customers but how do they review and price the support and knowledge of the author…?

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PixelBuffet says

I hope that doesn’t become a possibility, i.e. if the proposed plugin/theme is not part of a larger app that does something quite different than the proposed material, then I’m expecting for it not to be accepted, otherwise the marketplace becomes pointless.
I think that is probably the key line that Envato would need to draw. If authors change their items to be 100% GPL, you are then fine to purchase and include them in your own work so long as the primary aim of your work differs from theirs.

That would prevent people from abusing GPL to copy / profit from each others work, and prevent you from competing with your own work.

If we all went GPL (which I can’t see happening, to be honest), then it would be a nightmare for the reviewers to police…!

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PixelBuffet says

@ PixelBuffet — Never cut corners on hosting. If a business is only willing to pay $6/month for hosting they’re not ready to run an ecommerce business. Hands down.

With shared hosting you cannot get a dedicated IP address, which is required for an SSL certificate. So you couldn’t use this for a secure eCommerce site anyway.

Magento is a highly engineered platform, and it does require using a server environment that is designed for the platform to run efficiently. Magento hosting is specialized, but not expensive (starting ~$25/month). I wrote a Magento hosting recommendation on my profile if you’d like more information.
Thanks for the response, and you’re quite right.

I took a look at your profile, got distracted and now I’m midway through your talk on ‘mobile first, responsive design for eCommerce’. It’s really great!

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PixelBuffet says

Smart move from Collis, an excellent response. :)

It will be interesting to see how this all pans out if authors do being switching to 100% GPL…

Anyone switching to 100% GPL will presumably lose the option of the extended license, right?

Also, if a CodeCanyon author goes 100% GPL, then TF theme authors could buy their plugin / slider / whatever and then bundle it into their theme. Correct?

Assuming that Envato don’t decide to prevent the above, then other CMS developers could also buy a WP theme and port it over to another platform and sell it here too – as the design is now GPL. Right?

In fact, how much would someone need to modify a theme / plugin before Envato would allow them to sell their ‘new’ version on the marketplaces?

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PixelBuffet says

Sorry to also jump in here, but how does Magento perform on shared hosting? A few years back I had to drop it as an option because a client was only prepared to pay for shared hosting, and their host refused to let them have Magento installed because it was so resource heavy. Is that still the case now?

I’ve been using JigoShop / WooCommerce for client sites – and generally it’s worked well, particularly as a lot of clients are already familiar with WordPress.

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PixelBuffet says

...at least spaghetti dude read the instructions. :p

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PixelBuffet says

In what way is it failing? Missing stylesheet?

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